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36
In "measured tones," Judge Kavanaugh refutes sex assault allegations

CBS News chief legal correspondent Jan Crawford, who has reported on most of the major judicial appointments and confirmation hearings of the past 15 years, joins "CBS This Morning" from Washington to discuss Judge Brett Kavanaugh's interview with Fox News ahead of Thursday's hearing.
Source: In "measured tones," Judge Kavanaugh refutes sex assault allegations

37
Eye Opener at 8: Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein's future uncertain

A look back at what we've been covering on "CBS This Morning." Subscribe to get the Eye Opener delivered straight to your inbox.
Source: Eye Opener at 8: Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein's future uncertain

38
Top DHS intel official says law limits their power to counter drone threats

The Department of Homeland Security is pressing Congress for more powers to stop malicious drones that could threaten the United States. Intelligence officials are increasingly concerned about the use of drones by terrorists and drug cartels. Only on "CBS This Morning," Jeff Pegues got rare access to drones in action at a Customs and Border Protection facility in Tucson, Arizona.
Source: Top DHS intel official says law limits their power to counter drone threats

39
Instagram co-founders stepping down from Facebook

Facebook acquired Instagram for $1 billion in 2012
Source: Instagram co-founders stepping down from Facebook

40
NASA study untangles smoke, pollution effects on clouds

A new NASA-led study helps answer decades-old questions about the role of smoke and human-caused air pollution on clouds and rainfall. Looking specifically at deep convective clouds -- tall clouds like thunderclouds, formed by warm air rising -- the study shows that smoky air makes it harder for these clouds to grow. Pollution, on the other hand, energizes their growth, but only if the pollution isn't heavy. Extreme pollution is likely to shut down cloud growth.



Researchers led by scientist Jonathan Jiang of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, used observational data from two NASA satellites to investigate the effects of smoke and human-made air pollutants at different concentrations on deep convective clouds.



The two satellites -- the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and CloudSat -- orbited on the same track only a few seconds apart from 2006 until this year. CloudSat uses a radar to measure cloud locations and heights worldwide, and CALIPSO uses an instrument called a lidar to measure smoke, dust, pollution and other microscopic particles in the air, which are collectively referred to as aerosols, at the same locations at almost the same time. The combined data sets allow scientists to study how aerosol particles affect clouds.



CALIPSO is able to classify aerosols into several types, a capability which was improved two years ago when the CALIPSO mission team developed improved data-processing techniques. At about the same time, the CloudSat team also improved its classification of the cloud types. Jiang's team knew that these improvements had the potential to clarify how different aerosols affect the ability of clouds to grow. It took him and his colleagues about two years to go through both data sets, choose the best five-year period and Earth regions to study, and do the analysis.



Clouds typically cannot form without some aerosols, because water vapor in the air does not easily condense into liquid water or ice unless it comes in contact with an aerosol particle. But there are many types of aerosols -- not only the ones studied here but volcanic ash, sea salt and pollen, for example -- with a wide range of sizes, colors, locations and other characteristics. All of these characteristics affect the way aerosols interact with clouds. Even the same type of aerosol may have different effects at different altitudes in the atmosphere or at different concentrations of particles.



Smoke particles absorb heat radiation emitted by the ground. This increases the temperature of the smoke particles, which can then warm the air. At the same time they block incoming sunlight, which keeps the ground cooler. That reduces the temperature difference between the ground and the air. For clouds to form, the ground needs to be warmer and the air cooler so that moisture on the ground can evaporate, rise and condense higher in the atmosphere. By narrowing the temperature gap between the ground and the air, smoke suppresses cloud formation and growth.



Human-pollutant aerosols like sulfates and nitrates, on the other hand, do not absorb much heat radiation. In moderate concentrations, they add more particles to the atmosphere for water to condense onto, enabling clouds to grow taller. If pollution is very heavy, however, the sheer number of particles in the sky blocks incoming sunlight -- an effect often visible in the world's most polluted cities. That cools the ground just as smoke aerosols do, inhibiting the formation of clouds.



The scientists also studied dust aerosols and found that their characteristics varied so much from place to place that they could either suppress or energize cloud formation. "It's about the complexity in dust color and size," Jiang said. "Sahara dust may be lighter, while dust from an Asian desert might likely be darker." A blanket of lighter-colored or smaller dust scatters incoming sunlight while not warming the air. Larger or darker dust particles absorb sunlight and warm the air.



The paper in Nature Communications is titled "Contrasting Effects on Deep Convective Clouds by Different Types of Aerosols." Coauthors are from UCLA; Caltech in Pasadena, California; the University of Colorado, Boulder; NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia; and the University of Wyoming, Laramie.


Source: NASA study untangles smoke, pollution effects on clouds

41
New study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS









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Hurricane Harvey dumped more than 5 feet (1.5 meters) of water on southeast Texas in late August 2017, making it the wettest recorded hurricane in U.S. history. But after the storm passed, where did all that water go?



In a new, NASA-led study, scientists used Global Positioning System (GPS) data to answer that question and to track not just where Harvey's stormwater ended up on land, but also how long it took to dissipate.



"We determined that in the first eight days post-landfall, 30 percent of Harvey's stormwater was captured or stored on land -- most as standing water that sits on the surface. Around 60 percent was lost or drained into the ocean and Galveston Bay over the first few days after the storm, and the remaining 10 percent was lost via evapotranspiration, or a combination of evaporation and plant transpiration," said first author Chris Milliner of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.



The 30 percent of water that was stored on land then gradually dissipated over a period of about five weeks, likely through evapotranspiration, groundwater runoff into nearby rivers and the replenishment of aquifers.



How it works



Made up of satellites, receivers and ground stations located around the world, GPS allows scientists to measure changes in Earth's surface elevation to an accuracy of less than an inch (a few millimeters). It works much like GPS on your mobile phone but with greater accuracy. The study team used daily elevation measurements from about 220 of these ground stations, from western Texas to Louisiana, to track changes in the amount of stormwater on land after the hurricane.



"When you sit on a mattress, your weight depresses its surface. Earth's crust is also elastic and behaves in a similar way under the weight of water," said Milliner. "GPS is measuring the amount of subsidence (or depression), which tells you how much water mass must be pressing on the surface and where that water is distributed."



The team determined that in the first several days after Hurricane Harvey, the land around Houston lowered in elevation by as much as 20 millimeters. The GPS data also tracked a clear pattern of land subsidence that migrated across the Gulf Coast over a seven-day period, consistent with the position of Hurricane Harvey. Following this initial land subsidence, measurements from GPS stations found that Earth's surface gradually rose back up, indicating water was draining and evaporating from land -- just as a mattress behaves when you slowly stand up and remove your weight from it.



To detect Earth's mattress-like response to changes in water mass, the team first had to process the GPS data to remove systematic errors called common mode error (CME). CME acts essentially as "noise" that masks the hydrologic signal. Using an independent component-analysis filter, the team was able to statistically separate the raw GPS data into CME and hydrologic signals. This allowed them to discard the signal that was noise and extract the subtle hydrologic signal they sought.



With the filtered GPS data, scientists were able to determine the daily magnitude and location of the surface depression and from this calculate the daily mass of water that caused it.



Why it matters



The study demonstrates -- for the first time -- that it is possible to robustly quantify daily changes in water storage following extreme precipitation events like major hurricanes. It allows us to see how much water is temporarily stored on land after a major hurricane, where it is stored, and how long it takes for stored water to dissipate over time.



Scientists wanting to understand how the hydrologic system behaves in response to large storms benefit from this information, but so do water and flood managers. If they know how much water was stored on land and how long it took for the water to dissipate after a major precipitation event, they have a clearer understanding of what to expect when the next major, rain-intensive storm hits -- and can prepare accordingly.



The study, titled "Tracking the Weight of Hurricane Harvey's Stormwater Using GPS Data," was recently published by the journal Science Advances.



News media contact



Esprit Smith

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-354-4269

esprit.smith@jpl.nasa.gov


Source: New study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS

42
NASA gets up close with Greenland's melting ice









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With a new research plane and a new base to improve its chances of outsmarting Atlantic hurricanes, NASA's Oceans Melting Greenland campaign takes to the sky this week for its third year of gathering data on how the ocean around Greenland is melting its glaciers.



OMG's first two years of operations already collected the most comprehensive data available on the subject, but OMG Principal Investigator Josh Willis of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is hungry for more. "We're beginning to see some surprising changes in the ocean, just since the start of OMG in 2016, that are affecting the ice," said Willis, an oceanographer at JPL. "We want to see if those changes are still there after two years, and if they're spreading farther along the Greenland coast."



Willis and Project Manager Steve Dinardo, also of JPL, are leaving for Greenland this week on an airborne campaign to do just that. For the third year in a row, they will drop about 250 probes just offshore all around the island, with some drops close to the fronts of ocean-terminating glaciers. The probes sink 3,000 feet (1,000 meters) into the seawater, recording temperature and salinity as they go. The researchers hope to make their first flight on Aug 22 and complete the work in two to three weeks, depending on weather.



Beating the weather



Unfortunately for OMG, the best time to drop probes into the ocean around Greenland -- the time with the most open water -- is during hurricane season. "Hurricanes go up to Greenland to die," said Dinardo. "In 2016, there were days the winds were so strong we couldn't even open the hangar doors." Weather groundings stretched the planned three-week deployment to five weeks.



In 2017, weather struck closer to home: Hurricane Harvey sidelined the Houston-based plane and crew just days before the campaign was scheduled to begin. Dinardo managed to locate a viable alternative aircraft and get the OMG team airborne within a month of the originally planned start.



This year's new plane and new base should improve OMG's weather odds. The plane, a Basler BT-67 operated by NASA contractor Airtec, can take off and land on a shorter runway than either of the planes OMG previously used. That allows the team to base their east coast operations in Kulusuk, a small airport in southeastern Greenland, rather than a larger airport in Iceland. The lengthy "commute" from Iceland cut into the time available for research on each flight, and the longer flight path meant more places where there might be bad weather.



When they complete the east coast drops, the team will move to Thule, a U.S. air base in northwestern Greenland, for drops on the western side of the island.



"Being in Greenland the whole time, we can get a little more up close and personal with the ice sheet and glaciers," Willis said.



OMG and narwhals



The changing ocean around Greenland affects living creatures as well as glaciers. Narwhals -- smallish whales with long single tusks -- are uniquely adapted to Arctic waters, moving seasonally from the open ocean to the glacier fronts of Greenland and Canada. Kristin Laidre, a research scientist at the University of Washington in Seattle, studies these elusive mammals and their habitats. She quickly saw the value of OMG's observations, publishing the first peer-reviewed paper to use OMG data.



Laidre and Ian Fenty of JPL, an OMG co-principal investigator, are on the west side of Greenland from the airborne OMG team this week, on a six-day research cruise. Their team will place moorings in front of three important glaciers in northwestern Greenland, with acoustic recorders and OMG data loggers attached to the mooring chains. These instruments will log ocean temperature and conductivity (used to calculate salinity) and detections of narwhals.



This intensive local data set is likely to add new insights into OMG's larger-scale measurements, Fenty said. "Because the instruments will take measurements every hour for two years, we will get a totally new understanding of the changing ocean close to the ice," he noted. "These data will help us interpret our OMG probe data and allow us to evaluate and improve our [computer] simulations of the ocean currents in the area."



Laidre said, "We don't know a lot about what's important to narwhals -- how physical oceanography influences their habitat preferences. OMG is collecting really detailed information on the physics of the system. For us, having access to those data and working with the OMG investigators can bring us a long way in studying these animals."



News media contact



Esprit Smith

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California

818-354-4269

Esprit.Smith@jpl.nasa.gov


Source: NASA gets up close with Greenland's melting ice

43
Lawmaker's siblings explain why they endorsed his opponent

Six siblings of U.S. Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona endorsed his Democratic opponent in an air. Two of those siblings, Grace Gosar and Tim Gosar, joined CBSN for Fort Collins, Colorado to discuss why they decided to speak out against their brother.
Source: Lawmaker's siblings explain why they endorsed his opponent

44
Alaska judge gives man charged with sexual assault zero jail time

Justin Schneider pleaded guilty to felony assault but was only sentenced to two years in jail, with one of those years were suspended and the other is counted as served from the year he spent at home on an ankle monitor pending trial. A group of Alaska residents are working to unseat the judge who gave Schneider what they see as a lenient sentencing. Attorney Jesse Weber joins CBSN to discuss.
Source: Alaska judge gives man charged with sexual assault zero jail time

45
Trump to meet with Rod Rosenstein Thursday

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is expected to meet with President Trump Thursday to discuss the future of his job. The meeting comes after a storm of speculation Monday morning that Rosenstein was heading to the White House to be fired or resign. CBS News Washington correspondent Paula Reid joins CBSN to discuss the latest developments.
Source: Trump to meet with Rod Rosenstein Thursday

46
Cruz, O'Rourke spar in first Texas Senate debate

Republican Senator Ted Cruz and Democratic Rep. Beto O'Rourke clashed Friday during the first debate of the surprisingly close Texas senate race. Gromer Jeffers, a political writer for the Dallas Morning News, and a moderator at the debate, joins CBSN's "Red and Blue" to discuss the key moments.
Source: Cruz, O'Rourke spar in first Texas Senate debate

47
WPC Politics Forum / CBSvideo...9/24/18: Red and Blue
« on: Yesterday at 05:00:04 »
9/24/18: Red and Blue

Major Rosenstein & Kavanaugh developments; Cruz & O'Rourke face off in Texas
Source: 9/24/18: Red and Blue

48
San Juan's mayor responds to Trump's remarks on statehood

Puerto Rico's Gov. Ricardo Rosselló condemned President Trump for rejecting the island's potential future statehood. Carmen Yulín Cruz, the mayor of San Juan, joins CBS News David Begnaud on CBSN to discuss Mr. Trump's comments on the issue.
Source: San Juan's mayor responds to Trump's remarks on statehood

49
Listen to Malea Emma Tjandrawidjaja sing

Malea Emma Tjandrawidjaja wowed fans before the LA Galaxy match Sunday with her rendition of the national anthem. Her talents were on full display when she talked, and sang, for CBS News' Jamie Yuccas.
Source: Listen to Malea Emma Tjandrawidjaja sing

50
3D-printed gun backer Cody Wilson out of jail after sex-with-minor charge

Cody Wilson, the owner of a Texas company that sells plans to make untraceable 3D-printed guns, was freed on bond from a Texas jail Sunday evening after being arrested in Taiwan where, police say, he flew after learning he was being investigated for allegedly having sex with an underage girl.
Source: 3D-printed gun backer Cody Wilson out of jail after sex-with-minor charge

51
Kavanaugh denies sexual misconduct allegations

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh denied sexual misconduct allegations and said he will not withdraw his nomination. His denial to Fox News comes after a second woman came forward with allegations against him. CBS News chief congressional correspondent. Nancy Cordes joined CBSN to discuss the latest.
Source: Kavanaugh denies sexual misconduct allegations

52
WPC Politics Forum / CBSvideo...9/24/18: CBSN Evening News
« on: Yesterday at 05:00:04 »
9/24/18: CBSN Evening News

Second woman accuses Kavanaugh of misconduct; Judge facing controversy over light sentence
Source: 9/24/18: CBSN Evening News

53
Electrical implant helps paralyzed patients walk again

Three people whose legs were paralyzed for years can stand and take steps again, researchers report
Source: Electrical implant helps paralyzed patients walk again

54
Microsoft president Brad Smith on AI for humanitarian concerns, cybersecurity

Microsoft is launching a new artificial intelligence initiative that the tech giant says will help save lives. First on "CBS This Morning," Microsoft president Brad Smith discusses the $40 million program called AI for Humanitarian Action. It aims to speed up new AI solutions in four areas: disaster response, needs of children, protecting refugees and displaced people and human rights.
Source: Microsoft president Brad Smith on AI for humanitarian concerns, cybersecurity

55
Air Force Refueling Mission Over Horn of Africa Holds Steady

As of Aug. 31, Air Force tankers had conducted 2,919 sorties and offloaded 92.3 million pounds of fuel to coalition fighters.

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Source: Air Force Refueling Mission Over Horn of Africa Holds Steady

56
7-year-old girl wows crowd with stunning rendition of national anthem

A 7-year-old girl's rendition of the national anthem stunned fans before Sunday's LA Galaxy match. Malea Emma Tjandrawidjaja's talent was on full display, and she wowed the crowd. CBS News correspondent Jamie Yuccas has the story.
Source: 7-year-old girl wows crowd with stunning rendition of national anthem

57
WPC Politics Forum / CBSvideo...New words approved for Scrabble
« on: Mon Sep 24, 2018 - 20:00:02 »
New words approved for Scrabble

Merriam-Webster released the sixth edition of "The Official Scrabble Players Dictionary" with 300 new words. That includes "qapik," a monetary unit in Azerbaijan, and one of 20 playable words that start with q. It also includes "ok" and "ew."
Source: New words approved for Scrabble

58
Indonesian teen survives 49 days alone at sea

Aldi Novel Adilang, 19, worked alone on a fishing raft when a storm snapped the line, sending his raft adrift. But he managed to survive for 49 days as he drifted from Indonesia to Guam. CBS News correspondent David Begnaud explains.
Source: Indonesian teen survives 49 days alone at sea

59
Experimental device helping paralyzed patients walk again

Two studies out Monday point to significant progress in helping paralyzed people stand and take steps. A new treatment may provide hope for nearly 1.3 million Americans who have paralysis from spinal cord injuries. CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jonathan LaPook reports.
Source: Experimental device helping paralyzed patients walk again

60
Bill Cosby facing prison time at sentence hearing

Bill Cosby will be sentenced Tuesday for drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand 14 years ago. Cosby, who is 81, was facing 30 years in prison, but at a hearing Monday, the judge combined three counts into one. CBS News national correspondent Jericka Duncan reports.
Source: Bill Cosby facing prison time at sentence hearing

61
Trump to meet Rosenstein amid questions about possible ouster

While speaking to reporters at the United Nations, President Trump said he will meet with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein later this week to discuss reports the top official wanted to remove the president from office. Earlier in the day, it appeared Rosenstein was on the verge of resigning or being fired. CBS News Washington correspondent Paula Reid reports.
Source: Trump to meet Rosenstein amid questions about possible ouster

62
Trump backs Kavanaugh after 2nd accuser comes forward

President Trump continues to sympathize with his Supreme Court nominee, and says he's hopeful Brett Kavanaugh will be confirmed quickly. The president is also questioning what's motivating women to accuse Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct. CBS News White House correspondent Weijia Jiang reports.
Source: Trump backs Kavanaugh after 2nd accuser comes forward

63
Kavanaugh denies accusations after 2nd accuser comes forward

Judge Brett Kavanaugh vowed to fight on Monday, after a second woman came forward to accuse him of misconduct decades ago. A vote on Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination won't come until his first accuser testifies under oath. CBS News chief congressional correspondent Nancy Cordes reports.
Source: Kavanaugh denies accusations after 2nd accuser comes forward

64
"CBS Evening News" headlines for Monday, September 24, 2018

Here's a look at the top stories making headlines on the "CBS Evening News" with Jeff Glor.
Source: "CBS Evening News" headlines for Monday, September 24, 2018

65
Trump's tone about Kim Jong Un quite different than last year's "Rocket Man" speech

At the United Nations General Assembly in New York, President Trump announced plans are in the works for a second summit between himself and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. CBS News State Department reporter Kylie Atwood speaks to CBSN's "Red & Blue" about what's changed since this time last year.
Source: Trump's tone about Kim Jong Un quite different than last year's "Rocket Man" speech

66
Tiger Woods wins first PGA tournament in 5 years

Golf legend Tiger Woods has won his first PGA tournament since 2013. Bill Reiter, host of CBS Sports HQ's "Reiter Than You," spoke to CBSN about the victory, plus the highlights from NFL Week 3.
Source: Tiger Woods wins first PGA tournament in 5 years

67
WPC Politics Forum / CBSvideo...What to expect from Trump's UN speech
« on: Mon Sep 24, 2018 - 20:00:02 »
What to expect from Trump's UN speech

President Trump will address the 73rd United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday. CBS News White House correspondent Weijia Jiang spoke to CBSN about why the president's tone on North Korea is expected to be different from last year.
Source: What to expect from Trump's UN speech

68
Trump, national politics affect Georgia gubernatorial race

Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Brian Kemp are in a tight race to be the next governor of Georgia. National issues and President Trump are having an impact. Atlanta Journal Constitution  political reporter Greg Bluestein joins CBSN with the latest.
Source: Trump, national politics affect Georgia gubernatorial race

69
Firefighters throw birthday party for 3-year-old after guests cancel on him

Jackson was devastated when his guests canceled on his birthday party. Then, the Harrisburg, North Carolina, Fire Department came to the rescue and surprised him with a day he will never forget.
Source: Firefighters throw birthday party for 3-year-old after guests cancel on him

70
Trump: 2nd Kim summit to take place in "not-too-distant future"

In a meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-In on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly, President Trump said an announcement on plans for his second summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un will happen "pretty soon."
Source: Trump: 2nd Kim summit to take place in "not-too-distant future"

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