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1
Kim leads LPGA Shanghai by 1 stroke after 2 rounds

Sei Young Kim shot a 5-under 67 to take a one-stroke lead after the second round of the Buick LPGA Shanghai tournament
Source: Kim leads LPGA Shanghai by 1 stroke after 2 rounds

2
Keino denies wrongdoing, tells AP he didn’t control money

Keino denies wrongdoing, tells AP he didn't control money
Source: Keino denies wrongdoing, tells AP he didn’t control money

3
Red Sox sail into World Series, set for ace Sale's return

The Boston Red Sox head to the World Series, looking every bit like the team that led the majors with 108 wins this season
Source: Red Sox sail into World Series, set for ace Sale's return

4
Ducati rider Dovizioso fastest in practice for Japan MotoGP

Ducati rider Andrea Dovizioso clocked the fastest time in practice for the MotoGP Grand Prix of Japan
Source: Ducati rider Dovizioso fastest in practice for Japan MotoGP

5
Lots of Broncos fans on hand to watch rout of Cardinals

There were a lot of orange-clad Denver fans in the stands in Arizona for the Broncos' 45-10 win over the Cardinals
Source: Lots of Broncos fans on hand to watch rout of Cardinals

6
Piercy shoots 65 to lead by 1 at CJ Cup at Nine Bridges

Piercy shoots 65 to lead by 1 at CJ Cup at Nine Bridges
Source: Piercy shoots 65 to lead by 1 at CJ Cup at Nine Bridges

7
No. 2 Buckeyes still seeking improvement on trip to Purdue

Jeff Brohm sees all sorts of challenges in No. 2 Ohio State
Source: No. 2 Buckeyes still seeking improvement on trip to Purdue

8
Surging No. 19 Iowa returns home to host talented Maryland

Surging No. 19 Iowa returns home to host talented Maryland
Source: Surging No. 19 Iowa returns home to host talented Maryland

9
Winless Huskers are still sore about 2017 loss to Minnesota

Winless Nebraska still smarting over lopsided loss to Minnesota in 2017
Source: Winless Huskers are still sore about 2017 loss to Minnesota

10
Spartans, Wolverines showing respect before big matchup

No. 6 Michigan and No. 24 Michigan State have been respectful of one another in the days leading up to their clash this weekend
Source: Spartans, Wolverines showing respect before big matchup

11
No. 18 Penn St., Indiana seeking to rebound from struggles

Penn State coach James Franklin is all too familiar with the scenario he faces this week
Source: No. 18 Penn St., Indiana seeking to rebound from struggles

12
Division still in sight, No. 23 Wisconsin hosts Illini next

With division title still in sights, No. 23 Wisconsin looks to get back on track against visiting Illinois.
Source: Division still in sight, No. 23 Wisconsin hosts Illini next

13
Week 8 Preview: ACC showdown; Heisman Herbert; Auburn slump

Week 8 Preview: ACC showdown; Heisman Herbert; Auburn slump
Source: Week 8 Preview: ACC showdown; Heisman Herbert; Auburn slump

14
Stanford beats Arizona State 20-13 for key road victory

K.J. Costello threw for 231 yards and a touchdown, and Stanford remained in the thick of the Pac-12 North Division race with a 20-13 win over Arizona State
Source: Stanford beats Arizona State 20-13 for key road victory

15
Hansen has 5 TDs, Arkansas State beats Georgia State 51-35

Justice Hansen threw three touchdown passes and ran for two scores, helping Arkansas State beat Georgia State 51-35
Source: Hansen has 5 TDs, Arkansas State beats Georgia State 51-35

16
Cowboys' draft gamble paying off in emerging LB Jaylon Smith

Jaylon Smith is turning into the linebacker the Dallas Cowboys gambled on getting early in the 2016 draft
Source: Cowboys' draft gamble paying off in emerging LB Jaylon Smith

17
"Tornado Alley" may be moving to the densely-populated Southeast

One of the study's authors said climate change could be the reason for the creeping of drier air in the Southeast
Source: "Tornado Alley" may be moving to the densely-populated Southeast

18
Facebook cybersecurity executive talks election "war room"

The social media giant says the "war room" will streamline decision-making if midterm threats emerge
Source: Facebook cybersecurity executive talks election "war room"

19
Trump says it "certainly looks" like Jamal Khashoggi is dead

In his strongest remarks to date, President Trump Thursday said it appears missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi is dead. Mr. Trump said Saudi Arabia will face serious consequences if implicated in Khashoggi's death. CBS News White House correspondent Weijia Jiang joins CBSN to discuss the latest.
Source: Trump says it "certainly looks" like Jamal Khashoggi is dead

20
Trump makes it personal in campaigning for Montana Republican candidates

President Trump gave his first of three consecutive days of rallying in Montana, where he campaigned for Republican Rep. Greg Gianforte and Senate candidate Matt Rosendale. Montana Public Radio senior news analyst Sally Mauk joins CBSN to discuss.
Source: Trump makes it personal in campaigning for Montana Republican candidates

21
Trump says midterm elections are a "referendum about me"

President Trump has frequently told Republican voters the midterm elections are a referendum on his presidency. CBSN political reporter Caitlin Huey-Burns; CBS News political contributor and Republican strategist Leslie Sanchez; and Democratic strategist, former Senate leadership aide, and MWWPR vice president Joel Payne join CBSN's "Red and Blue" to discuss the role the president is playing in the midterms.
Source: Trump says midterm elections are a "referendum about me"

22
Trump issues threats over immigrant caravan heading to U.S.

Thousands of immigrants are heading to the U.S. from Central American. President Trump is now threatening to take military action and cut off aid from Central American nations. CBS News justice and homeland security correspondent Jeff Pegues joined CBSN with the latest.
Source: Trump issues threats over immigrant caravan heading to U.S.

23
Meghan and Harry charm locals on Australian tour

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are celebrating their royal baby news in Australia. Crowds of fans have lined up to congratulate them. CBS News foreign correspondent Jonathan Vigliotti has more.
Source: Meghan and Harry charm locals on Australian tour

24
Former USA Gymnastics CEO arrested on charges linked to Larry Nassar case

The former CEO for USA Gymnastics was arrested Wednesday after a grand jury indicted him. Steve Penny is accused of destroying or hiding documents surrounding the case of former gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar. CBS News correspondent Tony Dokoupil reports.
Source: Former USA Gymnastics CEO arrested on charges linked to Larry Nassar case

25
Accusations of voter suppression cloud Georgia governor's race

The talk of the gubernatorial race in Georgia is about the right to vote. Democrat Stacy Abrams is accusing her Republican opponent of trying to block black voters. CBS News chief congressional correspondent Nancy Cordes reports.
Source: Accusations of voter suppression cloud Georgia governor's race

26
Afghanistan's upcoming election overshadowed by violence

Just two days before parliamentary elections in Afghanistan, there is mounting violence that has locals worried. Polling stations have been closed and candidates have been assassinated. CBS News foreign correspondent Charlie D'Agata reports from Kabul.
Source: Afghanistan's upcoming election overshadowed by violence

27
Justice Department investigating sex abuse within Catholic Church for first time

For the first time, the U.S. Justice Department has opened an investigation into child sex abuse within the Catholic Church. CBS News has learned the investigation has expanded to multiple states. CBS News' Nikki Battiste reports.
Source: Justice Department investigating sex abuse within Catholic Church for first time

28
Top DHS official Chris Krebs says ensuring election security is "a race without an end"

Chris Krebs, under secretary for the Department of Homeland Security for National Protection and Programs Directorate, tells CBS News ensuring election security is "a race without end." On "The Takeout," CBS News' Major Garrett asks Krebs about elections of the modern era and the task of battling attempted interference.
Source: Top DHS official Chris Krebs says ensuring election security is "a race without an end"

29
Trump threatens to shut down southern border over caravan of migrants

President Trump threatened to mobilize the military and shut down the southern border to stop a caravan of Central American migrants from entering the U.S. As many as 4,000 people are making the journey. CBS News justice and homeland security correspondent Jeff Pegues reports.
Source: Trump threatens to shut down southern border over caravan of migrants

30
Trump: "Certainly looks like" missing Saudi journalist is dead

President Trump said it appears missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi is dead. The Saudis, he said, will face serious consequences if implicated. CBS News White House correspondent Weijia Jiang has the latest.
Source: Trump: "Certainly looks like" missing Saudi journalist is dead

31
"CBS Evening News" headlines for Thursday, October 18, 2018

Here's a look at the top stories making headlines on the "CBS Evening News" with Jeff Glor.
Source: "CBS Evening News" headlines for Thursday, October 18, 2018

32
"An Uncivil War": Is Democracy in danger in the Age of Trump?

In his new book "An Uncivil War", author Greg Sargent looks at how the pillars of democracy have been stressed since President Trump took office. CBS News' Reena Ninan interviewed Sargent a few weeks ahead of the pivotal 2018 midterm elections.
Source: "An Uncivil War": Is Democracy in danger in the Age of Trump?

33
AI colonoscopies may produce smarter results, doctors say

New test uses artificial intelligence to spot polyps, where all colorectal cancers begin. Doctors hope the technology will help save lives. CBS News' Chris Martinez reports.
Source: AI colonoscopies may produce smarter results, doctors say

34
Nasa Newsfeed Forum / NASA...All eyes on Hurricane Michael
« on: Yesterday at 20:04:45 »
All eyes on Hurricane Michael









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slide 2 - MISR's stereo anaglyph






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Hurricane Michael plowed into the Florida panhandle Wednesday, Oct. 10, as a major Category 4 storm -- the strongest hurricane ever to hit that region. Many NASA instruments are keeping tabs on Michael from space, including the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR).



The first image, taken by AIRS, shows Hurricane Michael just off the west coast of Florida on Oct. 10 in the early morning hours local time. The large purple area indicates very cold clouds at about -90°F (-68°C) carried high into the atmosphere by deep thunderstorms. These storm clouds are associated with heavy rainfall. The eye, which is much warmer than the surrounding clouds, appears in green. The red areas moving away from the storm indicate temperatures of around 60°F (15°C), typical of the surface of Earth at night. These red areas are mostly cloud-free.



MISR carries nine cameras fixed at different angles, each of which viewed Michael over the course of approximately seven minutes when it was just off Florida's west coast on Tuesday, Oct. 9.



Images from the nine views are used to calculate the height of the cloud tops, and the motion of the clouds between the views provides information on wind speed and direction. This first MISR image shows the view from the central, downward-pointing camera (left), the calculated cloud-top heights (middle) and wind velocity arrows (right) superimposed on top. The length of the arrows is proportional to wind speed, and the colors show the altitude of the cloud tops in kilometers.



MISR's stereo anaglyph shows a three-dimensional view of Michael that combines two of MISR's camera angles. Using 3D red-blue glasses, you can see a number of bright "clumps." These clumps, called "vortical hot towers," are groups of strong thunderstorms embedded in the larger circulation of the hurricane. They indicate the rapid transport of heat energy from the ocean surface into the storm and usually occur when a hurricane intensifies quickly.



The National Hurricane Center clocked Michael's sustained wind speed at 150 mph (240 kph) just before noon local time on Wednesday, Oct. 10. It is expected to bring strong winds, storm surges and heavy rainfall to much of the southeast.



AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), senses emitted infrared and microwave radiation from Earth to provide a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather and climate. Working in tandem, the two instruments make simultaneous observations down to Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, three-dimensional map of atmospheric temperature and humidity, cloud amounts and heights, greenhouse gas concentrations, and many other atmospheric phenomena. Launched into Earth orbit in 2002, the AIRS and AMSU instruments fly onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and are managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech, in Pasadena, California.



MISR was built and is managed by JPL for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The instrument flies aboard the Terra satellite, which is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center in Hampton, Virginia.



More information about AIRS is available here https://airs.jpl.nasa.gov/.



More information on MISR is available here https://misr.jpl.nasa.gov/.


Source: All eyes on Hurricane Michael

35
NASA tests tiny satellites to track global storms









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How many times have you stepped outside into a surprise rainstorm without an umbrella and wished that weather forecasts were more accurate?



A satellite no bigger than a shoebox may one day help. Small enough to fit inside a backpack, the aptly named RainCube (Radar in a CubeSat) uses experimental technology to see storms by detecting rain and snow with very small instruments. The people behind the miniature mission celebrated after RainCube sent back its first images of a storm over Mexico in a technology demonstration in August. Its second wave of images in September caught the first rainfall of Hurricane Florence.



The small satellite is a prototype for a possible fleet of RainCubes that could one day help monitor severe storms, lead to improving the accuracy of weather forecasts and track climate change over time.





The same storm captured by RainCube is seen here in infrared from a single, large weather satellite, NOAA's GOES (Geoweather Operational Environmental Satellite).

The same storm captured by RainCube is seen here in infrared from a single, large weather satellite, NOAA's GOES (Geoweather Operational Environmental Satellite). Credit: NOAA

Larger view




"We don't have any way of measuring how water and air move in thunderstorms globally," said Graeme Stephens, director of the Center of Climate Sciences at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "We just don't have any information about that at all, yet it's so essential for predicting severe weather and even how rains will change in a future climate."



RainCube is a type of "tech demo," an experiment to see if shrinking a weather radar into a low-cost, miniature satellite could still provide a real-time look inside storms. RainCube "sees" objects by using radar, much as a bat uses sonar. The satellite's umbrella-like antenna sends out chirps, or specialized radar signals, that bounce off raindrops, bringing back a picture of what the inside of the storm looks like.



Engineers like Principal Investigator Eva Peral had to figure out a way to help a small spacecraft send a signal strong enough to peer into a storm. "The radar signal penetrates the storm, and then the radar receives back an echo," said Peral. "As the radar signal goes deeper into the layers of the storm and measures the rain at those layers, we get a snapshot of the activity inside the storm."



Seeing the bigger picture



RainCube was deployed into low-Earth orbit from the International Space Station in July. The first images it sent back were from an area above Mexico, where it took a snapshot of a developing storm in August.



"There's a plethora of ground-based experiments that have provided an enormous amount of information, and that's why our weather forecasts nowadays are not that bad," said Simone Tanelli, the co-investigator for RainCube. "But they don't provide a global view. Also, there are weather satellites that provide such a global view, but what they are not telling you is what's happening inside the storm. And that's where the processes that make a storm grow and/or decay happen."



But RainCube is not meant to fulfill a mission of tracking storms all by itself. It is just the first demonstration that a mini-rain radar could work.



Because RainCube is miniaturized, making it less expensive to launch, many more of the satellites could be sent into orbit. Flying together like geese, they could track storms, relaying updated information on them every few minutes. Eventually, they could yield data to help evaluate and improve weather models that predict the movement of rain, snow, sleet and hail.



"We actually will end up doing much more interesting insightful science with a constellation rather than with just one of them," Stephens said. "What we're learning in Earth sciences is that space and time coverage is more important than having a really expensive satellite instrument that just does one thing."



And that future seems closer now that RainCube and other Earth-observing CubeSats like it have proved they can work.



"What RainCube offers on the one hand is a demonstration of measurements that we currently have in space today," said Stephens. "But what it really demonstrates is the potential for an entirely new and different way of observing Earth with many small radars. That will open up a whole new vista in viewing the hydrological cycle of Earth."



RainCube is a technology-demonstration mission to enable Ka-band precipitation radar technologies on a low-cost, quick-turnaround platform. It is sponsored by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office through the InVEST-15 program. JPL is working with Tyvak Nanosatellite Systems, Inc. in Irvine, California, to fly the RainCube mission.



News media contact



Arielle Samuelson

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-354-0307

arielle.a.samuelson@jpl.nasa.gov


Source: NASA tests tiny satellites to track global storms

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