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1
New NASA Podcast Shares ‘Invisible’ Stories of Spaceflight

Today, NASA released a new, limited-edition podcast called The Invisible Network, the first NASA podcast to embrace narrative storytelling. All six episodes can be downloaded and binged on NASA’s website, SoundCloud and Apple Podcasts.
Source: New NASA Podcast Shares ‘Invisible’ Stories of Spaceflight

2
Facebook working on "unsend" button for messages

The social network has been working on an "unsend" function, six months after CEO Mark Zuckerberg's messages to users suddenly disappeared​ from their inboxes
Source: Facebook working on "unsend" button for messages

3
NASA astronaut unfazed by frightening aborted launch

For NASA astronaut Nick Hague, who was making his first space flight, the long-awaited goal of finally flying in space was just out of reach
Source: NASA astronaut unfazed by frightening aborted launch

4
SpaceX rocket debris washes up along Outer Banks beach

The National Park Service said Elon Musk's company confirmed that "rocket hardware" was discovered at the Outer Banks
Source: SpaceX rocket debris washes up along Outer Banks beach

5
Uber reportedly worth more than Ford, GM, Tesla--combined

The driving-and-delivery company won't be profitable for years, but still worth double what it was in May, the Wall Street Journal reports
Source: Uber reportedly worth more than Ford, GM, Tesla--combined

6
Climate Diaries: Antarctica ice melting at an ever quicker rate

NASA's newest satellite designed to measure ice sheets over the North and South Poles is in its permanent orbit. Since then, NASA has relied on "Operation Ice Bridge," which sends planes to Antarctica from South America to study how fast ice sheets are melting. Mark Phillips went aboard for his latest installment of the Climate Diaries.
Source: Climate Diaries: Antarctica ice melting at an ever quicker rate

7
Bridge over Llano River collapses during massive flooding

Major flooding along the Llano River in Texas caused a bridge to collapse and wash away in the rushing water.
Source: Bridge over Llano River collapses during massive flooding

8
Prince Harry reunited with 98-year-old fan in Australia

This 98-year-old war widow is Prince Harry's biggest fan. And he always seems to find her in the crowd when he visits Australia.
Source: Prince Harry reunited with 98-year-old fan in Australia

9
Being tired on the job can lead to costly mistakes

A new national study shows nearly three-quarters of American workers are showing up on the job tired and it is bad for business. CBS News' Hilary Lane has the story from New York.
Source: Being tired on the job can lead to costly mistakes

10
Spike in cases of polio-like illness

The CDC says it's confirmed 62 cases of a polio-like ilness called acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM, so far this year. Over 90 percent of cases are in children. Tom Hanson reports.
Source: Spike in cases of polio-like illness

11
How new technology is changing the marijuana industry

Technology is having an impact on the the rapidly growing cannabis industry. CNET executive editor Roger Cheng joined CBSN to discuss developments, from harvesting tools to smart apps that monitor your marijuana intake, and the effect they're likely to have on the future of the business.
Source: How new technology is changing the marijuana industry

12
En Tiempo Real: Aereopuerto Internacional de la Ciudad de Mexico

En Tiempo Real: Aereopuerto Internacional de la Ciudad de Mexico
Source: En Tiempo Real: Aereopuerto Internacional de la Ciudad de Mexico

13
Todo En Uno: Obrador visita a Durango

Todo En Uno: Obrador visita a Durango
Source: Todo En Uno: Obrador visita a Durango

14
Former U.S. ambassador's advice to Trump on Saudi Arabia

Former U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia Robert Jordan joined CBSN to discuss the case of missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi. He said if he were advising President Trump he would tell him, "Use the leverage that you have."
Source: Former U.S. ambassador's advice to Trump on Saudi Arabia

15
Columbus Police release bodycam of cop confronting boys about realistic BB gun

"I could have killed you." An Ohio police department just released this video of a cop confronting two black teens with realistic BB guns. Listen to the full interaction.
Source: Columbus Police release bodycam of cop confronting boys about realistic BB gun

16
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry visit Sydney, receive gifts for unborn baby

Expecting dad Prince Harry spoke publicly about his baby with Meghan Markle. The couple is in Sydney, and received the most Australia gift for their unborn baby: a pair of tiny Uggs.
Source: Meghan Markle and Prince Harry visit Sydney, receive gifts for unborn baby

17
Woman's emotional reaction to passing bar exam goes viral

Video shows the moment a legal intern finds out she passed the bar exam and her emotional reaction has gone viral.
Source: Woman's emotional reaction to passing bar exam goes viral

18
Giant gator named "Chubbs" at it again

The giant gator famous for shocking unsuspecting golfers in Florida was just spotted again.
Source: Giant gator named "Chubbs" at it again

19
Nursing home patients happy to return after tornado

Elderly patients had to leave a Pennsylvania nursing home when a tornado hit two weeks ago. Their happiness to return home will melt your heart.
Source: Nursing home patients happy to return after tornado

20
Yemen's famine could be world's worst in 100 years

Yemen's humanitarian crisis is escalating to devastating levels. The United Nations warns up to 13 million civilians are at risk of starvation. BBC News correspondent Orla Guerin got rare access to the war-torn country and reports on the latest developments.
Source: Yemen's famine could be world's worst in 100 years

21
Royal wedding cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason performs Bach, "No Woman No Cry"

Sheku Kanneh-Mason became an instant sensation after his mesmerizing cello performance at the royal wedding in May. His album, Inspiration, charted #1 on classical charts in the U.S. and U.K. He joins Gayle King in the Toyota Green Room to discuss his U.S. concert debut this week and perform his own arrangement of Bob Marley’s “No Woman No Cry.”
Source: Royal wedding cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason performs Bach, "No Woman No Cry"

22
After two long careers, QuikSCAT rings down the curtain

Launched in June 1999 for an intended two-year mission, NASA's SeaWinds scatterometer instrument on the QuikSCAT spacecraft was turned off on Oct. 2 in accordance with its end-of-mission plan. QuikSCAT spent its first decade creating an unprecedented record of the speed and direction of winds at the ocean surface. Then, for another nine years, it served as the gold standard of accuracy against which new spaceborne scatterometers were calibrated.



Managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, QuikSCAT was a unique national resource that far surpassed NASA's original science objective for the mission. During its 10 years of observing winds over the global ocean surface, QuikSCAT measurements were used by the world's weather forecasting agencies to improve forecasts and identify and monitor hurricanes and other storms far out in the open seas. Its data also provided critical information for monitoring, researching, modeling, and forecasting the atmosphere, ocean, ice and climate.



Among its many accomplishments:




  • QuikSCAT discovered that hurricane-strength winds occur frequently in the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans, where such strong winds were not previously expected to exist.

  • It provided high-resolution observations of the dramatically accelerating changes in sea ice cover on the Arctic Ocean.

  • The mission's measurements were used widely beyond weather forecasting and research -- for example, to help identify efficient shipping routes, plan new offshore wind farms, and guide search-and-rescue operations at sea.



Michael Freilich, the QuikSCAT mission's original principal investigator and now director of NASA's Earth Science Division, noted, "QuikSCAT operated in space for nearly two decades, and we are certain that its impact and legacy will last much longer."



Ernesto Rodríguez, QuikSCAT project scientist at JPL, said, "The decommissioning of QuikSCAT marks the passing of an era. Many scientists and forecasters have built their careers over the last 20 years using QuikSCAT. Its data led to major discoveries on the interaction between the ocean and the atmosphere."



A few months after QuikSCAT's 10th anniversary, an age-related problem caused its spinning antenna to stop rotating, reducing its observing swath to only 19 miles (30 kilometers) wide. The extreme accuracy of this narrow swath measurement, however, allowed QuikSCAT to take on a second mission: calibrating newer satellites to enable a much longer data record of ocean winds.



Satellite instruments are regularly calibrated to ensure their readings match other data that are known to be accurate, and to correct for an instrument's normal drift in accuracy over time. QuikSCAT's exceptional stability made it invaluable in assuring that newer missions from the Indian and European space agencies and from NASA are providing apples-to-apples measurements. This function proved so important to the research community that QuikSCAT's decommissioning was postponed twice to allow time for new scatterometers to be launched and calibrated.



QuikSCAT project manager Rob Gaston of JPL said, "It's a testament to the research community's commitment to climate research that QuikSCAT's intercalibration mission has continued to receive the highest possible marks for science relevance in the reviews that NASA follows to establish funding priorities for missions like QuikSCAT. The intercalibration mission has enabled research that would not have been possible but for the remarkable stability of the SeaWinds instrument and the exceptional reliability and longevity of the QuikSCAT spacecraft."



QuikSCAT was originally a recovery mission after the loss of Japan's Advanced Earth Observing Satellite, which hosted the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT). The QuikSCAT mission was conceived, developed and launched in less than two years. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colorado, built the spacecraft bus, and JPL designed and built the SeaWinds instrument. QuikSCAT was operated by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado at Boulder.



News media contact



Esprit Smith

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California

818-354-4269

Esprit.Smith@jpl.nasa.gov


Source: After two long careers, QuikSCAT rings down the curtain

23
African smoke-cloud connection target of NASA airborne flights

Over the southeast Atlantic Ocean, a 2,000-mile-long plume of smoke from African agricultural fires meets a near-permanent cloud bank offshore. Their meeting makes a natural laboratory for studying the interactions between cloud droplets and the tiny airborne smoke particles. This month, NASA's P-3 research aircraft and a team of scientists return on their third deployment to this region as part of the Observations of Aerosols Above Clouds and their Interactions mission, or ORACLES, gathering data on how aerosols (such as smoke) affect clouds, and in turn, Earth's climate.



"The cloud deck in the southeast Atlantic is one of the largest on the globe," said atmospheric scientist Paquita Zuidema of the University of Miami, Florida, and co-principle investigator for the ORACLES deployment. "At the same time, the smoke layer stretches all the way to South America. The combination of smoke and clouds generates enough atmospheric warming to affect precipitation patterns over Africa in climate models, making it imperative to develop better confidence in the model predictions."






'A


A thick haze of milky-gray smoke overlies a blue ocean surface dotted with puffy white low clouds in this view of the smoke-cloud system over the southeast Atlantic Ocean, taken from the window of the P-3 during a science flight on August 24th, 2017. Credit: Michael Diamond




Aerosols include sea salt, dust, pollen and any particles, like smoke and ash, released during burning from industry or forest fires. Small enough to travel on prevailing winds, they are an important part of the atmosphere. Dark-colored aerosols can absorb sunlight, causing a warming effect, and light-colored ones can reflect sunlight, causing a cooling effect. Smoke can do both, depending on whether the particles within it occur over the dark ocean and look whiter in comparison, or above clouds and look darker.



Understanding how clouds and aerosols cooperate to determine the balance between climate warming and cooling is at the heart of the ORACLES mission, as well as the microphysical effects smoke particles can have on cloud droplets when they meet.



"We have major questions about how aerosol particles impact clouds and climate, and these interactions differ depending upon where you are on Earth," said atmospheric scientist Rob Wood of the University of Washington in Seattle and co-principal investigator for the ORACLES deployment. Lessons learned over the southeast Atlantic may be able to be applied to other regions where smoke from wildfires or industry interacts with clouds. By understanding the small-scale processes that occur when they meet within clouds, scientists are better able to refine how they describe aerosol-cloud interactions within global climate models, which in turn will help us understand aerosols' long-term effects on global and regional temperatures.



This October, the ORACLES team is based out of São Tomé and Principé, an equatorial island nation off the west coast of Africa, from which ORACLES also conducted their survey of the northern part of the smoke plume in August, 2017. ORACLES surveyed the southern extent of the plume from Walvis Bay, Namibia, in September, 2016. Each year's observations complement those of the other deployments, capturing the full range of the burning cycle in late summer and fall. African farmers burn their fields after harvest to return nutrients to the soil before the rain arrives and the burning moves southward as the rainy season progresses. The thickest part of the smoke plume moves southward with them. Wood and the team are eager to contrast what happens in October, when the rainy season has pushed the belt of agricultural fires farther south and they anticipate less smoke in the survey area.



NASA's P-3 research aircraft, managed by Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, carries a suite of 11 instruments, both remote sensing instruments as well as instruments that will directly sample the clouds and smoke plume through air inlets on the wings and windows. These direct measurements are like putting a microscope on what's happening inside the clouds.



"Last year in August, we saw a lot of physical contact between the smoke and the clouds," Wood said. "Cloud droplets actually formed on these smoke particles and there was a big increase in the number of droplets compared to what it would be like without the smoke."



In addition to developing a better understanding of cloud-aerosol behavior, the high-resolution airborne data will also be used to improve retrievals of smoke and cloud properties from satellites. From space, aerosol-detecting satellites capture the global view, but the trade-off in distance with current technology means a coarser resolution that can miss the microphysical interactions within the cloud and aerosol layers.



The October 2018 deployment currently underway is already producing a dataset with a few surprises. “We are seeing more aerosol than expected based on aerosol model forecasts and previous satellite assessments for this month,” said Zuidema. "Scientifically, we are seeing unexpected new features such as very large smoke particles that seem to be falling out of their smoke layers into the clouds below. We're seeing clouds that go from clean to polluted over large areas in only two days."



The ORACLES team will be documenting these and other observations through the end of the month.



ORACLES is a collaborative research effort involving nearly a hundred scientists from NASA centers, universities, and international partners. The project is managed by NASA's Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, California.



For more information, visit https://espo.nasa.gov/oracles.


Source: African smoke-cloud connection target of NASA airborne flights

24
All eyes on Hurricane Michael









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Hurricane Michael plowed into the Florida panhandle Wednesday, Oct. 10, as a major Category 4 storm -- the strongest hurricane ever to hit that region. Many NASA instruments are keeping tabs on Michael from space, including the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR).



The first image, taken by AIRS, shows Hurricane Michael just off the west coast of Florida on Oct. 10 in the early morning hours local time. The large purple area indicates very cold clouds at about -90°F (-68°C) carried high into the atmosphere by deep thunderstorms. These storm clouds are associated with heavy rainfall. The eye, which is much warmer than the surrounding clouds, appears in green. The red areas moving away from the storm indicate temperatures of around 60°F (15°C), typical of the surface of Earth at night. These red areas are mostly cloud-free.



MISR carries nine cameras fixed at different angles, each of which viewed Michael over the course of approximately seven minutes when it was just off Florida's west coast on Tuesday, Oct. 9.



Images from the nine views are used to calculate the height of the cloud tops, and the motion of the clouds between the views provides information on wind speed and direction. This first MISR image shows the view from the central, downward-pointing camera (left), the calculated cloud-top heights (middle) and wind velocity arrows (right) superimposed on top. The length of the arrows is proportional to wind speed, and the colors show the altitude of the cloud tops in kilometers.



MISR's stereo anaglyph shows a three-dimensional view of Michael that combines two of MISR's camera angles. Using 3D red-blue glasses, you can see a number of bright "clumps." These clumps, called "vortical hot towers," are groups of strong thunderstorms embedded in the larger circulation of the hurricane. They indicate the rapid transport of heat energy from the ocean surface into the storm and usually occur when a hurricane intensifies quickly.



The National Hurricane Center clocked Michael's sustained wind speed at 150 mph (240 kph) just before noon local time on Wednesday, Oct. 10. It is expected to bring strong winds, storm surges and heavy rainfall to much of the southeast.



AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), senses emitted infrared and microwave radiation from Earth to provide a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather and climate. Working in tandem, the two instruments make simultaneous observations down to Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, three-dimensional map of atmospheric temperature and humidity, cloud amounts and heights, greenhouse gas concentrations, and many other atmospheric phenomena. Launched into Earth orbit in 2002, the AIRS and AMSU instruments fly onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and are managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech, in Pasadena, California.



MISR was built and is managed by JPL for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The instrument flies aboard the Terra satellite, which is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center in Hampton, Virginia.



More information about AIRS is available here https://airs.jpl.nasa.gov/.



More information on MISR is available here https://misr.jpl.nasa.gov/.


Source: All eyes on Hurricane Michael

25
NASA tests tiny satellites to track global storms









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How many times have you stepped outside into a surprise rainstorm without an umbrella and wished that weather forecasts were more accurate?



A satellite no bigger than a shoebox may one day help. Small enough to fit inside a backpack, the aptly named RainCube (Radar in a CubeSat) uses experimental technology to see storms by detecting rain and snow with very small instruments. The people behind the miniature mission celebrated after RainCube sent back its first images of a storm over Mexico in a technology demonstration in August. Its second wave of images in September caught the first rainfall of Hurricane Florence.



The small satellite is a prototype for a possible fleet of RainCubes that could one day help monitor severe storms, lead to improving the accuracy of weather forecasts and track climate change over time.





The same storm captured by RainCube is seen here in infrared from a single, large weather satellite, NOAA's GOES (Geoweather Operational Environmental Satellite).

The same storm captured by RainCube is seen here in infrared from a single, large weather satellite, NOAA's GOES (Geoweather Operational Environmental Satellite). Credit: NOAA

Larger view




"We don't have any way of measuring how water and air move in thunderstorms globally," said Graeme Stephens, director of the Center of Climate Sciences at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "We just don't have any information about that at all, yet it's so essential for predicting severe weather and even how rains will change in a future climate."



RainCube is a type of "tech demo," an experiment to see if shrinking a weather radar into a low-cost, miniature satellite could still provide a real-time look inside storms. RainCube "sees" objects by using radar, much as a bat uses sonar. The satellite's umbrella-like antenna sends out chirps, or specialized radar signals, that bounce off raindrops, bringing back a picture of what the inside of the storm looks like.



Engineers like Principal Investigator Eva Peral had to figure out a way to help a small spacecraft send a signal strong enough to peer into a storm. "The radar signal penetrates the storm, and then the radar receives back an echo," said Peral. "As the radar signal goes deeper into the layers of the storm and measures the rain at those layers, we get a snapshot of the activity inside the storm."



Seeing the bigger picture



RainCube was deployed into low-Earth orbit from the International Space Station in July. The first images it sent back were from an area above Mexico, where it took a snapshot of a developing storm in August.



"There's a plethora of ground-based experiments that have provided an enormous amount of information, and that's why our weather forecasts nowadays are not that bad," said Simone Tanelli, the co-investigator for RainCube. "But they don't provide a global view. Also, there are weather satellites that provide such a global view, but what they are not telling you is what's happening inside the storm. And that's where the processes that make a storm grow and/or decay happen."



But RainCube is not meant to fulfill a mission of tracking storms all by itself. It is just the first demonstration that a mini-rain radar could work.



Because RainCube is miniaturized, making it less expensive to launch, many more of the satellites could be sent into orbit. Flying together like geese, they could track storms, relaying updated information on them every few minutes. Eventually, they could yield data to help evaluate and improve weather models that predict the movement of rain, snow, sleet and hail.



"We actually will end up doing much more interesting insightful science with a constellation rather than with just one of them," Stephens said. "What we're learning in Earth sciences is that space and time coverage is more important than having a really expensive satellite instrument that just does one thing."



And that future seems closer now that RainCube and other Earth-observing CubeSats like it have proved they can work.



"What RainCube offers on the one hand is a demonstration of measurements that we currently have in space today," said Stephens. "But what it really demonstrates is the potential for an entirely new and different way of observing Earth with many small radars. That will open up a whole new vista in viewing the hydrological cycle of Earth."



RainCube is a technology-demonstration mission to enable Ka-band precipitation radar technologies on a low-cost, quick-turnaround platform. It is sponsored by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office through the InVEST-15 program. JPL is working with Tyvak Nanosatellite Systems, Inc. in Irvine, California, to fly the RainCube mission.



News media contact



Arielle Samuelson

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-354-0307

arielle.a.samuelson@jpl.nasa.gov


Source: NASA tests tiny satellites to track global storms

26
New study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS









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Hurricane Harvey dumped more than 5 feet (1.5 meters) of water on southeast Texas in late August 2017, making it the wettest recorded hurricane in U.S. history. But after the storm passed, where did all that water go?



In a new, NASA-led study, scientists used Global Positioning System (GPS) data to answer that question and to track not just where Harvey's stormwater ended up on land, but also how long it took to dissipate.



"We determined that in the first eight days post-landfall, 30 percent of Harvey's stormwater was captured or stored on land -- most as standing water that sits on the surface. Around 60 percent was lost or drained into the ocean and Galveston Bay over the first few days after the storm, and the remaining 10 percent was lost via evapotranspiration, or a combination of evaporation and plant transpiration," said first author Chris Milliner of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.



The 30 percent of water that was stored on land then gradually dissipated over a period of about five weeks, likely through evapotranspiration, groundwater runoff into nearby rivers and the replenishment of aquifers.



How it works



Made up of satellites, receivers and ground stations located around the world, GPS allows scientists to measure changes in Earth's surface elevation to an accuracy of less than an inch (a few millimeters). It works much like GPS on your mobile phone but with greater accuracy. The study team used daily elevation measurements from about 220 of these ground stations, from western Texas to Louisiana, to track changes in the amount of stormwater on land after the hurricane.



"When you sit on a mattress, your weight depresses its surface. Earth's crust is also elastic and behaves in a similar way under the weight of water," said Milliner. "GPS is measuring the amount of subsidence (or depression), which tells you how much water mass must be pressing on the surface and where that water is distributed."



The team determined that in the first several days after Hurricane Harvey, the land around Houston lowered in elevation by as much as 20 millimeters. The GPS data also tracked a clear pattern of land subsidence that migrated across the Gulf Coast over a seven-day period, consistent with the position of Hurricane Harvey. Following this initial land subsidence, measurements from GPS stations found that Earth's surface gradually rose back up, indicating water was draining and evaporating from land -- just as a mattress behaves when you slowly stand up and remove your weight from it.



To detect Earth's mattress-like response to changes in water mass, the team first had to process the GPS data to remove systematic errors called common mode error (CME). CME acts essentially as "noise" that masks the hydrologic signal. Using an independent component-analysis filter, the team was able to statistically separate the raw GPS data into CME and hydrologic signals. This allowed them to discard the signal that was noise and extract the subtle hydrologic signal they sought.



With the filtered GPS data, scientists were able to determine the daily magnitude and location of the surface depression and from this calculate the daily mass of water that caused it.



Why it matters



The study demonstrates -- for the first time -- that it is possible to robustly quantify daily changes in water storage following extreme precipitation events like major hurricanes. It allows us to see how much water is temporarily stored on land after a major hurricane, where it is stored, and how long it takes for stored water to dissipate over time.



Scientists wanting to understand how the hydrologic system behaves in response to large storms benefit from this information, but so do water and flood managers. If they know how much water was stored on land and how long it took for the water to dissipate after a major precipitation event, they have a clearer understanding of what to expect when the next major, rain-intensive storm hits -- and can prepare accordingly.



The study, titled "Tracking the Weight of Hurricane Harvey's Stormwater Using GPS Data," was recently published by the journal Science Advances.



News media contact



Esprit Smith

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-354-4269

esprit.smith@jpl.nasa.gov


Source: New study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS

27
AP source: Bills QB Allen diagnosed with sprained elbow

AP source: Bills QB Allen diagnosed with sprained elbow
Source: AP source: Bills QB Allen diagnosed with sprained elbow

28
Altuve is Astros DH vs. Red Sox in ALCS Game 3

6-time All-Star 2nd baseman Jose Altuve is designated hitter for Houston Astros in playoffs for 1st time
Source: Altuve is Astros DH vs. Red Sox in ALCS Game 3

29
FOX Sports Ohio Announces Two New Additions to Cavaliers Broadcast Team

Angel Gray and Cayleigh Griffin join the team.
Source: FOX Sports Ohio Announces Two New Additions to Cavaliers Broadcast Team

30
Luka Doncic gives Mavs hope of transition to next Euro star

Luka Doncic gives Mavs hope of transition to next Euro star
Source: Luka Doncic gives Mavs hope of transition to next Euro star

31
Lightning goalie Louis Domingue ready for his 1st game of the season

Tampa Bay Lightning goalie Louis Domingue has know for a few days that his first start of the season was going to come Tuesday night against the Carolina Hurricanes.
Source: Lightning goalie Louis Domingue ready for his 1st game of the season

32
Vikings bring back DT Parry, place Hughes on IR

A month after releasing him, the Vikings have signed defensive tackle David Parry
Source: Vikings bring back DT Parry, place Hughes on IR

33
Joey Logano corroborates Corey Lajoie’s hilarious and gruesome story about a Darlington footrace

Corey Lajoie tells a hilarious story about a footrace at Darlington with Joey Logano that had gruesome ending, and Joey Logano corrorborates the entire thing.
Source: Joey Logano corroborates Corey Lajoie’s hilarious and gruesome story about a Darlington footrace

34
Colin Cowherd on the Packers MNF performance: ‘This is not a Super Bowl team’

Colin Cowherd talks NFL on today's show. He explains why the Green Bay Packers are not a championship contender and compares Aaron Rodgers to Dan Marino.
Source: Colin Cowherd on the Packers MNF performance: ‘This is not a Super Bowl team’

35
Rodgers, Crosby lead Packers to win over 49ers

The Packers outlasted the San Francisco 49ers for a 33-30 win on Monday night.
Source: Rodgers, Crosby lead Packers to win over 49ers

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