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1
YouTube fixes "access issues" causing widespread outage

YouTube suffered problems with its YouTube, YouTube TV and YouTube Music services after an outage that lasted more than an hour
Source: YouTube fixes "access issues" causing widespread outage

2
Thunderbirds Pilot Lost Consciousness Before Fatal Crash, Air Force Says

Maj. Stephen "Cajun" Del Bagno was performing a routine "Split-S" demonstration at the time of the tragic crash.

Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags
Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags
Source: Thunderbirds Pilot Lost Consciousness Before Fatal Crash, Air Force Says

3
WPC Politics Forum / CBSvideo...10/16/18: Red and Blue
« on: Today at 02:00:07 »
10/16/18: Red and Blue

O'Rourke and Cruz face off in Texas; trump on possible new family separation policy
Source: 10/16/18: Red and Blue

4
Sen. Cruz and Rep. O'Rourke sparred in 2nd Texas Senate debate

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and his Democratic opponent, Rep. Beto O'Rourke, D-El Paso, faced off in their second and final debate before the Nov. 6 election. See some of the highlights here.
Source: Sen. Cruz and Rep. O'Rourke sparred in 2nd Texas Senate debate

5
Trump pushes back on criticism of Saudi Arabia in interview with AP

In an interview with The Associated Press Tuesday, President Trump pushed back against criticism directed toward Saudi Arabia over the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. CBSN political contributor and AP White House reporter, Zeke Miller conducted the interview and joins CBSN's Elaine Quijano with more.
Source: Trump pushes back on criticism of Saudi Arabia in interview with AP

6
Secret Service intervenes when CBS News attempts to ask Jared Kushner a question

On a flight to New York Tuesday, CBS News correspondent Errol Barnett tried to ask President Trump's son-in-law and advisor Jared Kushner a question. However, Secret Service intervened.
Source: Secret Service intervenes when CBS News attempts to ask Jared Kushner a question

7
Trump criticizes condemnation of Saudi Arabia over missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi

In an interview Tuesday with The Associated Press, President Trump said condemnation of Saudi Arabia over Jamal Khoshoggi was another case of being "guilty before proven innocent." The comments come as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is in Riyadh trying to determine what happened to the Saudi critic. CBS News chief White House correspondent Major Garrett reports.
Source: Trump criticizes condemnation of Saudi Arabia over missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi

8
GOP Sen. Ted Cruz defending Senate seat ahead of midterms

Sen. Cruz, one time presidential hopeful, is now fighting to keep his Senate seat ahead of the midterms. Sean Sullivan, congressional reporter for the Washington Post, joins CBSN's "Red & Blue" with Tuesday's political headlines.
Source: GOP Sen. Ted Cruz defending Senate seat ahead of midterms

9
Immigration officials are using fingerprints from sponsors of unaccompanied children to make arrests

The Trump administration toughened the vetting process for potential sponsors of migrant children in U.S. government custody. As New York Times immigration reporter Caitlin Dickerson explains, the government is requiring fingerprints from everyone living in houses to which an unaccompanied would be released. Those fingerprints are being turned over to immigration officials, who use them to arrest undocumented immigrants.
Source: Immigration officials are using fingerprints from sponsors of unaccompanied children to make arrests

10
Hollywood Democrats gear up for midterm battle

With the midterms fast approaching, Kanye West's support of President Trump is a rarity for celebrities. Ted Johnson, a senior editor for Variety's Washington bureau, joins CBSN to discuss how Hollywood Democrats are doubling down ahead of the midterms.
Source: Hollywood Democrats gear up for midterm battle

11
3 generations of women attending the same university

Georgina Hutchison is attending the University of Massachusetts Lowell with some familiar faces. Her grandmother Mary and mother Deirdre decided to head back to class at the same time. CBS News national correspondent Chip Reid has their story.
Source: 3 generations of women attending the same university

12
10/16/18: CBSN Evening News

Pres. Trump condemns Saudi criticism; secret Service prevents CBS' questions
Source: 10/16/18: CBSN Evening News

13
Police officer confronts young boys carrying BB gun

In Columbus, Ohio, a police officer confronted two young children carrying what appeared to be a firearm, but was actually a BB gun. He used the encounter to teach the boys a lesson. CBS News national correspondent Dean Reynolds reports.
Source: Police officer confronts young boys carrying BB gun

14
Taliban threatens to disrupt upcoming elections in Afghanistan

Parliamentary elections are days away in Afghanistan. The Taliban and ISIS is doing all they can to disrupt the vote. CBS News foreign correspondent Charlie D'Agata reports from Nangarhar, the deadliest province for Americans in 2017.
Source: Taliban threatens to disrupt upcoming elections in Afghanistan

15
Search intensifies for missing 13-year-old Wisconsin girl Jayme Closs

Police are searching for a missing 13-year-old girl from Wisconsin, whose parents were found dead in their home Monday. FBI agents are helping officers look for Jayme Closs. CBS News national correspondent Adriana Diaz reports.
Source: Search intensifies for missing 13-year-old Wisconsin girl Jayme Closs

16
Elizabeth Warren criticized for releasing DNA report

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren is facing criticism for her decision to release results of a DNA test that she said proves she has Native American ancestors. President Trump called her "phony" and a "complete and total fraud." CBS News political correspondent Ed O'Keefe reports.
Source: Elizabeth Warren criticized for releasing DNA report

17
Central Texas hit with deadly flooding after days of rain

Flooding in central Texas turned deadly Tuesday following days of pouring rain. Some rivers are 13 feet above flood stage, prompting evacuations. CBS News' Courtney Zubowski reports.
Source: Central Texas hit with deadly flooding after days of rain

18
Nasa Newsfeed Forum / NASA...All eyes on Hurricane Michael
« on: Yesterday at 23:06:27 »
All eyes on Hurricane Michael









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slide 2 - MISR's stereo anaglyph






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Hurricane Michael plowed into the Florida panhandle Wednesday, Oct. 10, as a major Category 4 storm -- the strongest hurricane ever to hit that region. Many NASA instruments are keeping tabs on Michael from space, including the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR).



The first image, taken by AIRS, shows Hurricane Michael just off the west coast of Florida on Oct. 10 in the early morning hours local time. The large purple area indicates very cold clouds at about -90°F (-68°C) carried high into the atmosphere by deep thunderstorms. These storm clouds are associated with heavy rainfall. The eye, which is much warmer than the surrounding clouds, appears in green. The red areas moving away from the storm indicate temperatures of around 60°F (15°C), typical of the surface of Earth at night. These red areas are mostly cloud-free.



MISR carries nine cameras fixed at different angles, each of which viewed Michael over the course of approximately seven minutes when it was just off Florida's west coast on Tuesday, Oct. 9.



Images from the nine views are used to calculate the height of the cloud tops, and the motion of the clouds between the views provides information on wind speed and direction. This first MISR image shows the view from the central, downward-pointing camera (left), the calculated cloud-top heights (middle) and wind velocity arrows (right) superimposed on top. The length of the arrows is proportional to wind speed, and the colors show the altitude of the cloud tops in kilometers.



MISR's stereo anaglyph shows a three-dimensional view of Michael that combines two of MISR's camera angles. Using 3D red-blue glasses, you can see a number of bright "clumps." These clumps, called "vortical hot towers," are groups of strong thunderstorms embedded in the larger circulation of the hurricane. They indicate the rapid transport of heat energy from the ocean surface into the storm and usually occur when a hurricane intensifies quickly.



The National Hurricane Center clocked Michael's sustained wind speed at 150 mph (240 kph) just before noon local time on Wednesday, Oct. 10. It is expected to bring strong winds, storm surges and heavy rainfall to much of the southeast.



AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), senses emitted infrared and microwave radiation from Earth to provide a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather and climate. Working in tandem, the two instruments make simultaneous observations down to Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, three-dimensional map of atmospheric temperature and humidity, cloud amounts and heights, greenhouse gas concentrations, and many other atmospheric phenomena. Launched into Earth orbit in 2002, the AIRS and AMSU instruments fly onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and are managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech, in Pasadena, California.



MISR was built and is managed by JPL for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The instrument flies aboard the Terra satellite, which is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center in Hampton, Virginia.



More information about AIRS is available here https://airs.jpl.nasa.gov/.



More information on MISR is available here https://misr.jpl.nasa.gov/.


Source: All eyes on Hurricane Michael

19
NASA tests tiny satellites to track global storms









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How many times have you stepped outside into a surprise rainstorm without an umbrella and wished that weather forecasts were more accurate?



A satellite no bigger than a shoebox may one day help. Small enough to fit inside a backpack, the aptly named RainCube (Radar in a CubeSat) uses experimental technology to see storms by detecting rain and snow with very small instruments. The people behind the miniature mission celebrated after RainCube sent back its first images of a storm over Mexico in a technology demonstration in August. Its second wave of images in September caught the first rainfall of Hurricane Florence.



The small satellite is a prototype for a possible fleet of RainCubes that could one day help monitor severe storms, lead to improving the accuracy of weather forecasts and track climate change over time.





The same storm captured by RainCube is seen here in infrared from a single, large weather satellite, NOAA's GOES (Geoweather Operational Environmental Satellite).

The same storm captured by RainCube is seen here in infrared from a single, large weather satellite, NOAA's GOES (Geoweather Operational Environmental Satellite). Credit: NOAA

Larger view




"We don't have any way of measuring how water and air move in thunderstorms globally," said Graeme Stephens, director of the Center of Climate Sciences at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "We just don't have any information about that at all, yet it's so essential for predicting severe weather and even how rains will change in a future climate."



RainCube is a type of "tech demo," an experiment to see if shrinking a weather radar into a low-cost, miniature satellite could still provide a real-time look inside storms. RainCube "sees" objects by using radar, much as a bat uses sonar. The satellite's umbrella-like antenna sends out chirps, or specialized radar signals, that bounce off raindrops, bringing back a picture of what the inside of the storm looks like.



Engineers like Principal Investigator Eva Peral had to figure out a way to help a small spacecraft send a signal strong enough to peer into a storm. "The radar signal penetrates the storm, and then the radar receives back an echo," said Peral. "As the radar signal goes deeper into the layers of the storm and measures the rain at those layers, we get a snapshot of the activity inside the storm."



Seeing the bigger picture



RainCube was deployed into low-Earth orbit from the International Space Station in July. The first images it sent back were from an area above Mexico, where it took a snapshot of a developing storm in August.



"There's a plethora of ground-based experiments that have provided an enormous amount of information, and that's why our weather forecasts nowadays are not that bad," said Simone Tanelli, the co-investigator for RainCube. "But they don't provide a global view. Also, there are weather satellites that provide such a global view, but what they are not telling you is what's happening inside the storm. And that's where the processes that make a storm grow and/or decay happen."



But RainCube is not meant to fulfill a mission of tracking storms all by itself. It is just the first demonstration that a mini-rain radar could work.



Because RainCube is miniaturized, making it less expensive to launch, many more of the satellites could be sent into orbit. Flying together like geese, they could track storms, relaying updated information on them every few minutes. Eventually, they could yield data to help evaluate and improve weather models that predict the movement of rain, snow, sleet and hail.



"We actually will end up doing much more interesting insightful science with a constellation rather than with just one of them," Stephens said. "What we're learning in Earth sciences is that space and time coverage is more important than having a really expensive satellite instrument that just does one thing."



And that future seems closer now that RainCube and other Earth-observing CubeSats like it have proved they can work.



"What RainCube offers on the one hand is a demonstration of measurements that we currently have in space today," said Stephens. "But what it really demonstrates is the potential for an entirely new and different way of observing Earth with many small radars. That will open up a whole new vista in viewing the hydrological cycle of Earth."



RainCube is a technology-demonstration mission to enable Ka-band precipitation radar technologies on a low-cost, quick-turnaround platform. It is sponsored by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office through the InVEST-15 program. JPL is working with Tyvak Nanosatellite Systems, Inc. in Irvine, California, to fly the RainCube mission.



News media contact



Arielle Samuelson

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-354-0307

arielle.a.samuelson@jpl.nasa.gov


Source: NASA tests tiny satellites to track global storms

20
New study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS









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Hurricane Harvey dumped more than 5 feet (1.5 meters) of water on southeast Texas in late August 2017, making it the wettest recorded hurricane in U.S. history. But after the storm passed, where did all that water go?



In a new, NASA-led study, scientists used Global Positioning System (GPS) data to answer that question and to track not just where Harvey's stormwater ended up on land, but also how long it took to dissipate.



"We determined that in the first eight days post-landfall, 30 percent of Harvey's stormwater was captured or stored on land -- most as standing water that sits on the surface. Around 60 percent was lost or drained into the ocean and Galveston Bay over the first few days after the storm, and the remaining 10 percent was lost via evapotranspiration, or a combination of evaporation and plant transpiration," said first author Chris Milliner of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.



The 30 percent of water that was stored on land then gradually dissipated over a period of about five weeks, likely through evapotranspiration, groundwater runoff into nearby rivers and the replenishment of aquifers.



How it works



Made up of satellites, receivers and ground stations located around the world, GPS allows scientists to measure changes in Earth's surface elevation to an accuracy of less than an inch (a few millimeters). It works much like GPS on your mobile phone but with greater accuracy. The study team used daily elevation measurements from about 220 of these ground stations, from western Texas to Louisiana, to track changes in the amount of stormwater on land after the hurricane.



"When you sit on a mattress, your weight depresses its surface. Earth's crust is also elastic and behaves in a similar way under the weight of water," said Milliner. "GPS is measuring the amount of subsidence (or depression), which tells you how much water mass must be pressing on the surface and where that water is distributed."



The team determined that in the first several days after Hurricane Harvey, the land around Houston lowered in elevation by as much as 20 millimeters. The GPS data also tracked a clear pattern of land subsidence that migrated across the Gulf Coast over a seven-day period, consistent with the position of Hurricane Harvey. Following this initial land subsidence, measurements from GPS stations found that Earth's surface gradually rose back up, indicating water was draining and evaporating from land -- just as a mattress behaves when you slowly stand up and remove your weight from it.



To detect Earth's mattress-like response to changes in water mass, the team first had to process the GPS data to remove systematic errors called common mode error (CME). CME acts essentially as "noise" that masks the hydrologic signal. Using an independent component-analysis filter, the team was able to statistically separate the raw GPS data into CME and hydrologic signals. This allowed them to discard the signal that was noise and extract the subtle hydrologic signal they sought.



With the filtered GPS data, scientists were able to determine the daily magnitude and location of the surface depression and from this calculate the daily mass of water that caused it.



Why it matters



The study demonstrates -- for the first time -- that it is possible to robustly quantify daily changes in water storage following extreme precipitation events like major hurricanes. It allows us to see how much water is temporarily stored on land after a major hurricane, where it is stored, and how long it takes for stored water to dissipate over time.



Scientists wanting to understand how the hydrologic system behaves in response to large storms benefit from this information, but so do water and flood managers. If they know how much water was stored on land and how long it took for the water to dissipate after a major precipitation event, they have a clearer understanding of what to expect when the next major, rain-intensive storm hits -- and can prepare accordingly.



The study, titled "Tracking the Weight of Hurricane Harvey's Stormwater Using GPS Data," was recently published by the journal Science Advances.



News media contact



Esprit Smith

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-354-4269

esprit.smith@jpl.nasa.gov


Source: New study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS

21
Geneology Feed / This Week in History – October 15th
« on: Yesterday at 23:05:51 »
This Week in History – October 15th

This Week in History is Ancestry’s look back at notable events from the past. Every week, we will be featuring three moments in history from our Newspapers.com archives – anything from important anniversaries, to tragic occurrences, interesting tidbits to entertaining factoids, This Week in History is our way of remembering what came before us. During Read MoreWeb Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags
Source: This Week in History – October 15th

22
Johnson scores 3 goals, Lightning beat Hurricanes 4-2

Johnson scores 3 goals, Lightning beat Hurricanes 4-2
Source: Johnson scores 3 goals, Lightning beat Hurricanes 4-2

23
Anton Khudobin makes 31 saves, Stars shut out by Devils

Anton Khudobin made 31 saves as Dallas lost for the second time in as many nights.
Source: Anton Khudobin makes 31 saves, Stars shut out by Devils

24
Celtics beat 76ers 105-87 as Hayward, Irving make returns

Jayson Tatum had 23 points, Boston Celtics outlast the Philadelphia 76ers 105-87
Source: Celtics beat 76ers 105-87 as Hayward, Irving make returns

25
Five Clippers to watch heading into the season

With a new-look, young team for the 2018-19 season, a number of LA Clippers could see their roles increased as they continue to develop.
Source: Five Clippers to watch heading into the season

26
Rod Brind’Amour on what Hurricanes have learned from back-to-back losses

Rod Brind'Amour on what Hurricanes have learned from back-to-back losses
Source: Rod Brind’Amour on what Hurricanes have learned from back-to-back losses

27
Sargent scores, US gives up late goal in 1-1 tie with Peru

Sargent scores, US gives up late goal in 1-1 tie with Peru
Source: Sargent scores, US gives up late goal in 1-1 tie with Peru

28
Heat on McCoy again as Cardinals prepare for Broncos

Arizona was 0-for-10 on third down (0-for-2 on fourth down) in last Sunday's 27-17 loss at Minnesota.
Source: Heat on McCoy again as Cardinals prepare for Broncos

29
Weal’s shootout goal lifts Flyers past Panthers 6-5

Jordan Weal scored in the shootout to lift the Philadelphia Flyers over the Florida Panthers 6-5
Source: Weal’s shootout goal lifts Flyers past Panthers 6-5

30
Shattenkirk lifts Rangers to 3-2 win over Avalanche in SO

Kevin Shattenkirk scored the deciding goal in a shootout to lift the New York Rangers to a 3-2 win over the Colorado Avalanche
Source: Shattenkirk lifts Rangers to 3-2 win over Avalanche in SO

31
USC's Gustin has surgery, should be ready for NFL workouts

USC's Gustin has surgery, should be ready for NFL workouts
Source: USC's Gustin has surgery, should be ready for NFL workouts

32
No. 24 Spartans have 'chip' back with No. 6 Michigan looming

No. 24 Spartans have 'chip' back with No. 6 Michigan looming
Source: No. 24 Spartans have 'chip' back with No. 6 Michigan looming

33
Iowa State to appeal $25K Big 12 fine for field storming

Iowa State to appeal $25K Big 12 fine for field storming
Source: Iowa State to appeal $25K Big 12 fine for field storming

34
Gophers RB Brooks back with team following arrest

Coach P.J. Fleck said Tuesday that senior running back Shannon Brooks' playing status was "evolving."
Source: Gophers RB Brooks back with team following arrest

35
Status of Minnesota RB Brooks 'evolving' following arrest

Minnesota RB Shannon Brooks back with team, playing status 'evolving' following weekend arrest
Source: Status of Minnesota RB Brooks 'evolving' following arrest

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