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1
New study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS









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Hurricane Harvey dumped more than 5 feet (1.5 meters) of water on southeast Texas in late August 2017, making it the wettest recorded hurricane in U.S. history. But after the storm passed, where did all that water go?



In a new, NASA-led study, scientists used Global Positioning System (GPS) data to answer that question and to track not just where Harvey's stormwater ended up on land, but also how long it took to dissipate.



"We determined that in the first eight days post-landfall, 30 percent of Harvey's stormwater was captured or stored on land -- most as standing water that sits on the surface. Around 60 percent was lost or drained into the ocean and Galveston Bay over the first few days after the storm, and the remaining 10 percent was lost via evapotranspiration, or a combination of evaporation and plant transpiration," said first author Chris Milliner of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.



The 30 percent of water that was stored on land then gradually dissipated over a period of about five weeks, likely through evapotranspiration, groundwater runoff into nearby rivers and the replenishment of aquifers.



How it works



Made up of satellites, receivers and ground stations located around the world, GPS allows scientists to measure changes in Earth's surface elevation to an accuracy of less than an inch (a few millimeters). It works much like GPS on your mobile phone but with greater accuracy. The study team used daily elevation measurements from about 220 of these ground stations, from western Texas to Louisiana, to track changes in the amount of stormwater on land after the hurricane.



"When you sit on a mattress, your weight depresses its surface. Earth's crust is also elastic and behaves in a similar way under the weight of water," said Milliner. "GPS is measuring the amount of subsidence (or depression), which tells you how much water mass must be pressing on the surface and where that water is distributed."



The team determined that in the first several days after Hurricane Harvey, the land around Houston lowered in elevation by as much as 20 millimeters. The GPS data also tracked a clear pattern of land subsidence that migrated across the Gulf Coast over a seven-day period, consistent with the position of Hurricane Harvey. Following this initial land subsidence, measurements from GPS stations found that Earth's surface gradually rose back up, indicating water was draining and evaporating from land -- just as a mattress behaves when you slowly stand up and remove your weight from it.



To detect Earth's mattress-like response to changes in water mass, the team first had to process the GPS data to remove systematic errors called common mode error (CME). CME acts essentially as "noise" that masks the hydrologic signal. Using an independent component-analysis filter, the team was able to statistically separate the raw GPS data into CME and hydrologic signals. This allowed them to discard the signal that was noise and extract the subtle hydrologic signal they sought.



With the filtered GPS data, scientists were able to determine the daily magnitude and location of the surface depression and from this calculate the daily mass of water that caused it.



Why it matters



The study demonstrates -- for the first time -- that it is possible to robustly quantify daily changes in water storage following extreme precipitation events like major hurricanes. It allows us to see how much water is temporarily stored on land after a major hurricane, where it is stored, and how long it takes for stored water to dissipate over time.



Scientists wanting to understand how the hydrologic system behaves in response to large storms benefit from this information, but so do water and flood managers. If they know how much water was stored on land and how long it took for the water to dissipate after a major precipitation event, they have a clearer understanding of what to expect when the next major, rain-intensive storm hits -- and can prepare accordingly.



The study, titled "Tracking the Weight of Hurricane Harvey's Stormwater Using GPS Data," was recently published by the journal Science Advances.



News media contact



Esprit Smith

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-354-4269

esprit.smith@jpl.nasa.gov


Source: New study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS

2
NASA gets up close with Greenland's melting ice









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With a new research plane and a new base to improve its chances of outsmarting Atlantic hurricanes, NASA's Oceans Melting Greenland campaign takes to the sky this week for its third year of gathering data on how the ocean around Greenland is melting its glaciers.



OMG's first two years of operations already collected the most comprehensive data available on the subject, but OMG Principal Investigator Josh Willis of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is hungry for more. "We're beginning to see some surprising changes in the ocean, just since the start of OMG in 2016, that are affecting the ice," said Willis, an oceanographer at JPL. "We want to see if those changes are still there after two years, and if they're spreading farther along the Greenland coast."



Willis and Project Manager Steve Dinardo, also of JPL, are leaving for Greenland this week on an airborne campaign to do just that. For the third year in a row, they will drop about 250 probes just offshore all around the island, with some drops close to the fronts of ocean-terminating glaciers. The probes sink 3,000 feet (1,000 meters) into the seawater, recording temperature and salinity as they go. The researchers hope to make their first flight on Aug 22 and complete the work in two to three weeks, depending on weather.



Beating the weather



Unfortunately for OMG, the best time to drop probes into the ocean around Greenland -- the time with the most open water -- is during hurricane season. "Hurricanes go up to Greenland to die," said Dinardo. "In 2016, there were days the winds were so strong we couldn't even open the hangar doors." Weather groundings stretched the planned three-week deployment to five weeks.



In 2017, weather struck closer to home: Hurricane Harvey sidelined the Houston-based plane and crew just days before the campaign was scheduled to begin. Dinardo managed to locate a viable alternative aircraft and get the OMG team airborne within a month of the originally planned start.



This year's new plane and new base should improve OMG's weather odds. The plane, a Basler BT-67 operated by NASA contractor Airtec, can take off and land on a shorter runway than either of the planes OMG previously used. That allows the team to base their east coast operations in Kulusuk, a small airport in southeastern Greenland, rather than a larger airport in Iceland. The lengthy "commute" from Iceland cut into the time available for research on each flight, and the longer flight path meant more places where there might be bad weather.



When they complete the east coast drops, the team will move to Thule, a U.S. air base in northwestern Greenland, for drops on the western side of the island.



"Being in Greenland the whole time, we can get a little more up close and personal with the ice sheet and glaciers," Willis said.



OMG and narwhals



The changing ocean around Greenland affects living creatures as well as glaciers. Narwhals -- smallish whales with long single tusks -- are uniquely adapted to Arctic waters, moving seasonally from the open ocean to the glacier fronts of Greenland and Canada. Kristin Laidre, a research scientist at the University of Washington in Seattle, studies these elusive mammals and their habitats. She quickly saw the value of OMG's observations, publishing the first peer-reviewed paper to use OMG data.



Laidre and Ian Fenty of JPL, an OMG co-principal investigator, are on the west side of Greenland from the airborne OMG team this week, on a six-day research cruise. Their team will place moorings in front of three important glaciers in northwestern Greenland, with acoustic recorders and OMG data loggers attached to the mooring chains. These instruments will log ocean temperature and conductivity (used to calculate salinity) and detections of narwhals.



This intensive local data set is likely to add new insights into OMG's larger-scale measurements, Fenty said. "Because the instruments will take measurements every hour for two years, we will get a totally new understanding of the changing ocean close to the ice," he noted. "These data will help us interpret our OMG probe data and allow us to evaluate and improve our [computer] simulations of the ocean currents in the area."



Laidre said, "We don't know a lot about what's important to narwhals -- how physical oceanography influences their habitat preferences. OMG is collecting really detailed information on the physics of the system. For us, having access to those data and working with the OMG investigators can bring us a long way in studying these animals."



News media contact



Esprit Smith

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California

818-354-4269

Esprit.Smith@jpl.nasa.gov


Source: NASA gets up close with Greenland's melting ice

3
What are the repercussions of a potential Kavanaugh, Ford open hearing?

Amy Walter, Dan Balz, Seung Min Kim and Reihan Salam discuss the partisan tinge the Kavanaugh, Ford hearing will put on the #MeToo movement and the questions senators are preparing for the hearing.
Source: What are the repercussions of a potential Kavanaugh, Ford open hearing?

4
Battleground Tracker: House control edges towards Democrats

CBS News Elections and Survey Director Anthony Salvanto and political correspondent Ed O’Keefe break down the latest insights into the midterms from CBS News’ Battleground Tracker polling.
Source: Battleground Tracker: House control edges towards Democrats

5
Face The Nation -  Seung Min Kim, Amy Walter, Reihan Salam, Dan Balz,

Missed the second half of the show? The latest on  what's going to happen in the Kavanaugh, Ford hearing.
Source: Face The Nation -  Seung Min Kim, Amy Walter, Reihan Salam, Dan Balz,

6
Theresa May says she believes Iran is holding up its end of the nuclear deal

Ahead of the United Nations General Assembly, John Dickerson interviewed Theresa May about Brexit and American foreign policy. Tune into CBS This Morning Monday for more of the interview.
Source: Theresa May says she believes Iran is holding up its end of the nuclear deal

7
Christine Blasey Ford's congresswoman: Ford "should be given the respect she deserves"

Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-California, was the first elected official to hear Christine Blasey Ford's accusations, and she tells John Dickerson why she believed Ford’s story.
Source: Christine Blasey Ford's congresswoman: Ford "should be given the respect she deserves"

8
Rep. Trey Gowdy urges Senate to be "fair to the witness" in Kavanaugh, Ford hearings

Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-South Carolina, says that both Judge Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford will live with the consequences of this week’s public hearing for the rest of their lives.
Source: Rep. Trey Gowdy urges Senate to be "fair to the witness" in Kavanaugh, Ford hearings

9
UN Ambassador Nikki Haley on sanctioning allies doing business with Iran:  "We're not giving them a pass"

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley joins John Dickerson to preview what is on the U.S. agenda for this week’s United Nations General Assembly meeting.
Source: UN Ambassador Nikki Haley on sanctioning allies doing business with Iran:  "We're not giving them a pass"

10
Open: This is Face the Nation, September 23

This week on "Face the Nation," guest moderator John Dickerson interviews Ambassador Nikki Haley, Rep. Trey Gowdy and Rep. Anna Eshoo. Plus, we’ll review brand new CBS News Battleground Tracker polling showing the state of play just six weeks ahead of midterms.
Source: Open: This is Face the Nation, September 23

11
9/23: Nikki Haley, Trey Gowdy, Anna Eshoo

This week on "Face the Nation," guest moderator John Dickerson interviews Ambassador Nikki Haley, Rep. Trey Gowdy and Rep. Anna Eshoo. Plus, we’ll review brand new CBS News Battleground Tracker polling showing the state of play just six weeks ahead of midterms.
Source: 9/23: Nikki Haley, Trey Gowdy, Anna Eshoo

12
Passage: Arthur Mitchell and Robert Venturi

"Sunday Morning" remembers two artistic giants who passed away this week: Arthur Mitchell, co-founder of Dance Theatre of Harlem; and prize-winning architect and proponent of Modernism Robert Venturi. Jane Pauley reports.
Source: Passage: Arthur Mitchell and Robert Venturi

13
The remarkable legacy of Leonard Bernstein

It's hard to believe that Leonard Bernstein was just one person. He was the classical music world's first American-born superstar conductor; a composer of legendary Broadway shows like "West Side Story," and a pied piper for millions of future music lovers in his "Young People's Concerts" on CBS. Mo Rocca visits the Grammy Museum's exhibit now touring the country in honor of Bernstein's 100th birthday, and talks with Bernstein's daughter, Jamie, and with New York Philharmonic musician Stanley Drucker, about a most extraordinary musical legend.
Source: The remarkable legacy of Leonard Bernstein

14
WPC Politics Forum / CBSvideo...Murphy Brown is back!
« on: Today at 17:00:02 »
Murphy Brown is back!

Lee Cowan visits the set of the reincarnation of "Murphy Brown," and talks with star Candice Bergen (who won five Emmys for her role in the original show); series creator Diane English; and other members of the cast (many returning to roles they left 20 years ago) about a series that often tackled hot-button topics bring brought back in the age of Trump.
Source: Murphy Brown is back!

15
Answered prayers: What happens "when God shows up"

Although no one knew it at the time, Jerome Jones, a poor preacher at the Springfield Baptist Church in Monticello, Ga., recently went through a crisis of faith, until he received a message from the heavens – actually, a note attached to three balloons. Steve Hartman talks with Jones about how a cry for help renewed his faith.
Source: Answered prayers: What happens "when God shows up"

16
RuPaul: Dressed for success

The successful VH1 game show "RuPaul's Drag Race" features remarkably-named contestants (such as Sasha Velour, Kalorie Karbdashian Williams and Mayhem Miller) who compete for cash prizes and the title of America's Next Drag Superstar. RuPaul explains to Nancy Giles the power of a man performing in women's clothes, heels and makeup. (Originally broadcast March 11, 2018.)
Source: RuPaul: Dressed for success

17
Dr. Sanjay Gupta on how alcohol affects memory

Dr. Sanjay Gupta offers some answers to the question that hangs over the current Supreme Court confirmation battle of Brett Kavanaugh - and some wrong assumptions - regarding binge drinking and the effect of alcohol on one's memory of events.
Source: Dr. Sanjay Gupta on how alcohol affects memory

18
Click for a Killer: "48 Hours" season premiere preview

"48 Hours" covers the murder of a mother in the Midwest and unearths evidence that leads into the shadowy world of the dark web  -- where hiring a hit man is only a click away.
Correspondent Peter Van Sant’s investigation leads to arrests in four other murder plots, allegedly arranged by a shrouded mastermind – who cannot be found. Watch the two-hour season premiere Saturday, Sept. 29 at 9/8c on CBS.
Source: Click for a Killer: "48 Hours" season premiere preview

19
"48 Hours" season premiere preview: Click for a Killer

"48 Hours" covers the murder of a mother in the Midwest and unearths evidence that leads into the shadowy world of the dark web  -- where hiring a hit man is only a click away.
Correspondent Peter Van Sant’s investigation leads to arrests in four other murder plots, allegedly arranged by a shrouded mastermind – who cannot be found. Watch the two-hour season premiere Saturday, Sept. 29 at 9/8c on CBS.
Source: "48 Hours" season premiere preview: Click for a Killer

20
WPC Politics Forum / CBSvideo...Death by Text
« on: Yesterday at 23:00:06 »
Death by Text

Inside the groundbreaking trial of a crime of the digital age -- should a young woman go to prison for sending texts to a friend who took his own life? "48 Hours" correspondent Erin Moriarty investigates.
Source: Death by Text

21
Authorities find $18 million worth of cocaine hidden in banana shipment

Authorities in Texas say they discovered nearly $18 million worth of cocaine hidden in boxes of bananas. Reena Ninan reports.
Source: Authorities find $18 million worth of cocaine hidden in banana shipment

22
Puerto Rico's humanitarian crisis, one year after Hurricane Maria

One year ago, Puerto Rico was reeling in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Maria. In the following months, an estimated 3,000 people died from medical conditions that could not be treated in parts of the island. David Begnaud reports.
Source: Puerto Rico's humanitarian crisis, one year after Hurricane Maria

23
Militants attack Iran military parade, killing 25

Dozens were killed today in an attack on a military parade in Iran. It happened in a Southwestern Province that is home to Iran's Arab minority. Jonathan Vigliotti reports.
Source: Militants attack Iran military parade, killing 25

24
University of Maryland found culpable in football player's death

An investigation into the death of a University of Maryland football player found that proper procedures were not followed when the defensive lineman collapsed during practice. Kenneth Craig reports.
Source: University of Maryland found culpable in football player's death

25
Genealogy site helps catch suspected serial rapist

Investigators say DNA evidence and a genealogy website helped them track down a suspected serial rapist in Northern California. Carter Evans reports.
Source: Genealogy site helps catch suspected serial rapist

26
Floodwaters still a threat more than a week after Florence

Dangerous flood waters continue to pose a threat to North and South Carolina more than a week after Hurricane Florence made landfall. Manuel Bojorquez reports.
Source: Floodwaters still a threat more than a week after Florence

27
Kavanaugh accuser responds to Senate request

Christine Blasey Ford has agreed to "provide her first-hand knowledge of Brett Kavanaugh's sexual misconduct next week," according to a letter her lawyers sent to the Senate Judiciary Committee. Weijia Jiang reports.
Source: Kavanaugh accuser responds to Senate request

28
WPC Politics Forum / CBSvideo...9/22: CBS Evening News
« on: Yesterday at 23:00:06 »
9/22: CBS Evening News

Kavanaugh accuser responds to Senate request; Authorities find $18 million worth of cocaine hidden in banana shipment
Source: 9/22: CBS Evening News

29
"CBS Weekend News" headlines for Saturday, September 22, 2018

Here's a look at the top stories making headlines on the "CBS Weekend News" with Reena Ninan.
Source: "CBS Weekend News" headlines for Saturday, September 22, 2018

30
Cruz, O'Rourke square off in first debate in Texas Senate race

CBS News affiliate KENS reporter Roxie Bustamante speaks to voters.
Source: Cruz, O'Rourke square off in first debate in Texas Senate race

31
Rod Rosenstein reportedly says the DOJ should record President Trump

The New York Times reported Rod Rosenstein suggested invoking the 25th Amendment to impeach President Trump, although Rosenstein has denied the report. Loyala law school professor Jessica Levinson joined CBSN to break down what invoking the 25th Amendment would.
Source: Rod Rosenstein reportedly says the DOJ should record President Trump

32
Japan places landers on asteroid

Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft placed two small probes on the surface of an asteroid
Source: Japan places landers on asteroid

33
Twitter may have sent your private messages to the wrong people

A bug affected less than 1 percent of users, the company said
Source: Twitter may have sent your private messages to the wrong people

34
Saturday Sessions: Alejandro Escovedo performs “Something Blue”

From the leader of a punk band that opened for the Sex Pistols to his latest album – recorded with an Italian band in Rome – Alejandro Escovedo's career defies easy definition. The artist was inspired by crossing boundaries in a more literal sense for his 11th album, "The Crossing."
Source: Saturday Sessions: Alejandro Escovedo performs “Something Blue”

35
Saturday Sessions: Alejandro Escovedo performs “Sonica USA”

From the leader of a punk band that opened for the Sex Pistols to his latest album – recorded with an Italian band in Rome – Alejandro Escovedo's career defies easy definition. The artist was inspired by crossing boundaries in a more literal sense for his 11th album, "The Crossing."
Source: Saturday Sessions: Alejandro Escovedo performs “Sonica USA”

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