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1
Delta Air Lines hit with "technology issue," briefly grounds flights

Delta said earlier Tuesday that a ground stop was in effect only for flights to Atlanta -- which is the company's main hub
Source: Delta Air Lines hit with "technology issue," briefly grounds flights

2
Trump administration takes steps on crafting data privacy framework

Commerce Department seeks public comment on nationwide data privacy rules put forward Tuesday
Source: Trump administration takes steps on crafting data privacy framework

3
Dutch chef uses 3D printers to create tasty works of art

Jan Smink is the first to give printed food a permanent place in each course on the menu at his new restaurant
Source: Dutch chef uses 3D printers to create tasty works of art

4
Marine Corps Cancels Major AAV Upgrade, But Still Plans a New Gun Turret

The service recently issued a stop-work order to SAIC, which was under contract to improve the four-decade-old vehicle.

Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags
Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags
Source: Marine Corps Cancels Major AAV Upgrade, But Still Plans a New Gun Turret

5
NASA Administrator Talks Training, Future Missions with Newest Astronaut Class

NASA’s newest class of astronaut trainees will join agency Administrator Jim Bridenstine Thursday, Sept. 27, to talk about their experiences in the training program, hopes for future missions, and more, in a live episode of Watch This Space.
Source: NASA Administrator Talks Training, Future Missions with Newest Astronaut Class

6
NASA Extends Chandra Operations, Science Support Contract

NASA has awarded a contract extension to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to continue operations and science support for the agency's Chandra X-ray Observatory.
Source: NASA Extends Chandra Operations, Science Support Contract

7
New Airborne Campaigns to Explore Snowstorms, River Deltas, Climate

Five new NASA Earth science campaigns will take to the field starting in 2020 to investigate a range of pressing research questions, from what drives intense East Coast snowfall events to the impact of small-scale ocean currents on global climate.
Source: New Airborne Campaigns to Explore Snowstorms, River Deltas, Climate

8
WPC Politics Forum / CBSvideo...9/25/18: Red and Blue
« on: Yesterday at 23:00:42 »
9/25/18: Red and Blue

Trump dismisses second Kavanaugh accuser; California's competitive congressional contests
Source: 9/25/18: Red and Blue

9
WPC Politics Forum / CBSvideo...How We Remember
« on: Yesterday at 23:00:42 »
How We Remember

The show looks at the ways in which we memorialize and how we preserve collective memory
Source: How We Remember

10
New Zealand PM Jacinda Ardern's new baby steals the show at the U.N.

An unexpected scene at the U.N. General Assembly may do more good than all the big political speeches combined. New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern brought her 3-month-old daughter Neve, complete with her own baby name tag. CBS News correspondent Tony Dokoupil explains.
Source: New Zealand PM Jacinda Ardern's new baby steals the show at the U.N.

11
Maddox Ritch: FBI aiding in search for missing boy with autism

More than two dozen agencies including the FBI are searching for 6-year-old Maddox Ritch. The boy's father told investigators he wandered off while walking around a lake. CBS News correspondent David Begnaud reports.
Source: Maddox Ritch: FBI aiding in search for missing boy with autism

12
Can Trump and Pence help Republicans win Indiana's Senate seat?

President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence are throwing their weight behind Republican Senate challenger Mike Braun in Indiana, where Pence previously served as governor. Kaitlin Lange, state politics reporter for the Indianapolis Star, spoke to CBSN about whether Braun will be able unseat the incumbent, Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly.
Source: Can Trump and Pence help Republicans win Indiana's Senate seat?

13
Parents blindsided by daughter's suicide hope her story helps others

Alexandra Valoras was a straight-A student, class officer and robotics whiz. But her journals told a different story, with 200 pages of self-loathing and despair. CBS News senior national correspondent Jim Axelrod has her story.
Source: Parents blindsided by daughter's suicide hope her story helps others

14
Feinstein's Senate challenger goes on attack over Kavanaugh letter

Democrat Kevin de León, who is facing off against Sen. Dianne Feinstein, is attacking the five-time incumbent over her handling of the accusations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Marisa Lagos, state politics reporter for KQED Public Media, speaks to CBSN's "Red & Blue" about whether de León's offensive is having any impact on the race.
Source: Feinstein's Senate challenger goes on attack over Kavanaugh letter

15
Olive oil prices could jump as rough weather destroys crops

Olive farmers in California say this year's crop yields are dismal due to rough weather, and that may lead to higher prices for olive oil. CBS Sacramento's Christina Janes reports.
Source: Olive oil prices could jump as rough weather destroys crops

16
Trump touts "America first" policies at U.N. General Assembly

President Trump struck a defiant tone while addressing the United Nations General Assembly Tuesday, vowing the U.S. will go its own way on foreign policy issues. He also blasted Iran, while praising North Korea. CBS News White House correspondent Weijia Jiang reports.
Source: Trump touts "America first" policies at U.N. General Assembly

17
Republicans hire female lawyer to question Kavanaugh accuser at hearing

The 11 Republican men who sit on the Senate Judiciary Committee announced they've hired an unnamed female lawyer to question the woman who says Brett Kavanaugh groped her. She has repeatedly asked not to be grilled by a lawyer. CBS News chief congressional correspondent Nancy Cordes reports.
Source: Republicans hire female lawyer to question Kavanaugh accuser at hearing

18
Bill Cosby sentenced to 3 to 10 years in prison for sexual assault

Bill Cosby was sentenced Tuesday to three to 10 years in prison for drugging and sexually assaulting a woman in 2004. Cosby is now the first celebrity of the #MeToo era to be sent to prison. CBS News national correspondent Jericka Duncan reports.
Source: Bill Cosby sentenced to 3 to 10 years in prison for sexual assault

19
"CBS Evening News" headlines for Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Here's a look at the top stories making headlines on the "CBS Evening News" with Jeff Glor.
Source: "CBS Evening News" headlines for Tuesday, September 25, 2018

20
WPC Politics Forum / CBSvideo...9/25: CBS Evening News
« on: Yesterday at 23:00:41 »
9/25: CBS Evening News

Bill Cosby sentenced to 3 to 10 years in prison for sexual assault; New Zealand PM Jacinda Ardern's new baby steals the show at the U.N.
Source: 9/25: CBS Evening News

21
Bill Cosby sentenced to 3 to 10 years in prison for sexual assault

Bill Cosby was taken from the coutroom in handcuffs today after being sentenced for a sexual assault conviction in Pennsylvania. CBS News legal analyst Rikki Klieman joins CBSN with insights on the case and CBS News correspondent Jericka Duncan reports from the courthouse.
Source: Bill Cosby sentenced to 3 to 10 years in prison for sexual assault

22
Trump accuses Democrats of a "con game" with Kavanaugh assault allegations

President Trump is accusing Democrats of a "con game" with the allegations against Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Kavanaugh said in a TV interview that he never sexually assaulted anyone. The Hill's White House columnist Niall Stanage joins CBSN with more.
Source: Trump accuses Democrats of a "con game" with Kavanaugh assault allegations

23
Mars rover spotted from orbit after going silent

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has spotted the still-silent Opportunity rover on the surface of the red planet
Source: Mars rover spotted from orbit after going silent

24
Florence crippled electricity and coal -- solar and wind were back the next day

Renewable energy advocates say it is less vulnerable to severe storms than traditional electric utilities
Source: Florence crippled electricity and coal -- solar and wind were back the next day

25
Marine Leaders' Plea to Companies: Get Us Our Gear Faster

Some of the Marine Corps' top acquisition officers had strong words for contractors about the need to move gear into warfighters' hands.

Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags
Web Presence Consulting (#WPC) - Popular Tags
Source: Marine Leaders' Plea to Companies: Get Us Our Gear Faster

26
New study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS









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Hurricane Harvey dumped more than 5 feet (1.5 meters) of water on southeast Texas in late August 2017, making it the wettest recorded hurricane in U.S. history. But after the storm passed, where did all that water go?



In a new, NASA-led study, scientists used Global Positioning System (GPS) data to answer that question and to track not just where Harvey's stormwater ended up on land, but also how long it took to dissipate.



"We determined that in the first eight days post-landfall, 30 percent of Harvey's stormwater was captured or stored on land -- most as standing water that sits on the surface. Around 60 percent was lost or drained into the ocean and Galveston Bay over the first few days after the storm, and the remaining 10 percent was lost via evapotranspiration, or a combination of evaporation and plant transpiration," said first author Chris Milliner of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.



The 30 percent of water that was stored on land then gradually dissipated over a period of about five weeks, likely through evapotranspiration, groundwater runoff into nearby rivers and the replenishment of aquifers.



How it works



Made up of satellites, receivers and ground stations located around the world, GPS allows scientists to measure changes in Earth's surface elevation to an accuracy of less than an inch (a few millimeters). It works much like GPS on your mobile phone but with greater accuracy. The study team used daily elevation measurements from about 220 of these ground stations, from western Texas to Louisiana, to track changes in the amount of stormwater on land after the hurricane.



"When you sit on a mattress, your weight depresses its surface. Earth's crust is also elastic and behaves in a similar way under the weight of water," said Milliner. "GPS is measuring the amount of subsidence (or depression), which tells you how much water mass must be pressing on the surface and where that water is distributed."



The team determined that in the first several days after Hurricane Harvey, the land around Houston lowered in elevation by as much as 20 millimeters. The GPS data also tracked a clear pattern of land subsidence that migrated across the Gulf Coast over a seven-day period, consistent with the position of Hurricane Harvey. Following this initial land subsidence, measurements from GPS stations found that Earth's surface gradually rose back up, indicating water was draining and evaporating from land -- just as a mattress behaves when you slowly stand up and remove your weight from it.



To detect Earth's mattress-like response to changes in water mass, the team first had to process the GPS data to remove systematic errors called common mode error (CME). CME acts essentially as "noise" that masks the hydrologic signal. Using an independent component-analysis filter, the team was able to statistically separate the raw GPS data into CME and hydrologic signals. This allowed them to discard the signal that was noise and extract the subtle hydrologic signal they sought.



With the filtered GPS data, scientists were able to determine the daily magnitude and location of the surface depression and from this calculate the daily mass of water that caused it.



Why it matters



The study demonstrates -- for the first time -- that it is possible to robustly quantify daily changes in water storage following extreme precipitation events like major hurricanes. It allows us to see how much water is temporarily stored on land after a major hurricane, where it is stored, and how long it takes for stored water to dissipate over time.



Scientists wanting to understand how the hydrologic system behaves in response to large storms benefit from this information, but so do water and flood managers. If they know how much water was stored on land and how long it took for the water to dissipate after a major precipitation event, they have a clearer understanding of what to expect when the next major, rain-intensive storm hits -- and can prepare accordingly.



The study, titled "Tracking the Weight of Hurricane Harvey's Stormwater Using GPS Data," was recently published by the journal Science Advances.



News media contact



Esprit Smith

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-354-4269

esprit.smith@jpl.nasa.gov


Source: New study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS

27
NASA gets up close with Greenland's melting ice









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With a new research plane and a new base to improve its chances of outsmarting Atlantic hurricanes, NASA's Oceans Melting Greenland campaign takes to the sky this week for its third year of gathering data on how the ocean around Greenland is melting its glaciers.



OMG's first two years of operations already collected the most comprehensive data available on the subject, but OMG Principal Investigator Josh Willis of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is hungry for more. "We're beginning to see some surprising changes in the ocean, just since the start of OMG in 2016, that are affecting the ice," said Willis, an oceanographer at JPL. "We want to see if those changes are still there after two years, and if they're spreading farther along the Greenland coast."



Willis and Project Manager Steve Dinardo, also of JPL, are leaving for Greenland this week on an airborne campaign to do just that. For the third year in a row, they will drop about 250 probes just offshore all around the island, with some drops close to the fronts of ocean-terminating glaciers. The probes sink 3,000 feet (1,000 meters) into the seawater, recording temperature and salinity as they go. The researchers hope to make their first flight on Aug 22 and complete the work in two to three weeks, depending on weather.



Beating the weather



Unfortunately for OMG, the best time to drop probes into the ocean around Greenland -- the time with the most open water -- is during hurricane season. "Hurricanes go up to Greenland to die," said Dinardo. "In 2016, there were days the winds were so strong we couldn't even open the hangar doors." Weather groundings stretched the planned three-week deployment to five weeks.



In 2017, weather struck closer to home: Hurricane Harvey sidelined the Houston-based plane and crew just days before the campaign was scheduled to begin. Dinardo managed to locate a viable alternative aircraft and get the OMG team airborne within a month of the originally planned start.



This year's new plane and new base should improve OMG's weather odds. The plane, a Basler BT-67 operated by NASA contractor Airtec, can take off and land on a shorter runway than either of the planes OMG previously used. That allows the team to base their east coast operations in Kulusuk, a small airport in southeastern Greenland, rather than a larger airport in Iceland. The lengthy "commute" from Iceland cut into the time available for research on each flight, and the longer flight path meant more places where there might be bad weather.



When they complete the east coast drops, the team will move to Thule, a U.S. air base in northwestern Greenland, for drops on the western side of the island.



"Being in Greenland the whole time, we can get a little more up close and personal with the ice sheet and glaciers," Willis said.



OMG and narwhals



The changing ocean around Greenland affects living creatures as well as glaciers. Narwhals -- smallish whales with long single tusks -- are uniquely adapted to Arctic waters, moving seasonally from the open ocean to the glacier fronts of Greenland and Canada. Kristin Laidre, a research scientist at the University of Washington in Seattle, studies these elusive mammals and their habitats. She quickly saw the value of OMG's observations, publishing the first peer-reviewed paper to use OMG data.



Laidre and Ian Fenty of JPL, an OMG co-principal investigator, are on the west side of Greenland from the airborne OMG team this week, on a six-day research cruise. Their team will place moorings in front of three important glaciers in northwestern Greenland, with acoustic recorders and OMG data loggers attached to the mooring chains. These instruments will log ocean temperature and conductivity (used to calculate salinity) and detections of narwhals.



This intensive local data set is likely to add new insights into OMG's larger-scale measurements, Fenty said. "Because the instruments will take measurements every hour for two years, we will get a totally new understanding of the changing ocean close to the ice," he noted. "These data will help us interpret our OMG probe data and allow us to evaluate and improve our [computer] simulations of the ocean currents in the area."



Laidre said, "We don't know a lot about what's important to narwhals -- how physical oceanography influences their habitat preferences. OMG is collecting really detailed information on the physics of the system. For us, having access to those data and working with the OMG investigators can bring us a long way in studying these animals."



News media contact



Esprit Smith

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California

818-354-4269

Esprit.Smith@jpl.nasa.gov


Source: NASA gets up close with Greenland's melting ice

28
A preview of CBS' newest crime series, "FBI"

Emmy Award-winning producer Dick Wolf and the team behind "Law and Order," are bringing their latest crime drama to CBS. "FBI" looks at the inner workings of the bureau's New York office. Stars Missy Peregrym and Zeeko Zaki join CBSN to talk about their roles in the series. You can watch "FBI" Tuesdays at 9 p.m./8 Central  on CBS.
Source: A preview of CBS' newest crime series, "FBI"

29
Rod Rosenstein's future in question ahead of Thursday meeting with Trump

President Trump will meet with his deputy attorney general on Thursday after returning from meetings at the United Nations in New York. Reports swirled Monday that Rod Rosenstein would leave his position, which includes overseeing the special counsel investigation into Russia's election interference. CBS News Washington correspondent Paula Reid breaks down what to expect.
Source: Rod Rosenstein's future in question ahead of Thursday meeting with Trump

30
Trump touts "America First" agenda at U.N. General Assembly: Full speech

President Trump addressed the United Nations General Assembly in New York on Tuesday, saying, “In less than two years, my administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country.” He also touted “highly productive conversations and meetings" with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un but acknowledged "much work remains to be done." Among the other wide-ranging topics Mr. Trump discussed in his speech were the Iran nuclear deal, trade imbalance with China, and new sanctions on Venezuela.
Source: Trump touts "America First" agenda at U.N. General Assembly: Full speech

31
Trump on Kavanaugh allegations: "This is a con game being played by the Democrats"

President Trump blamed Democrats for playing a "con game" with the allegations against Judge Brett Kavanaugh. He also called into question Kavanaugh accuser Deborah Ramirez's account, saying she was "totally inebriated and all messed up."
Source: Trump on Kavanaugh allegations: "This is a con game being played by the Democrats"

32
Trump, Iran, and the role of the U.N. today

President Trump is set to adddress the United Nations General Assembly today. The annual event comes as some people question the UN's relevance and purpose in 2018. CBSN contributor and Signal newsletter writer for GZERO Media, Alex Kliment, takes us through the latest.
Source: Trump, Iran, and the role of the U.N. today

33
Thankful teenage boy gives sweet speech during adoption

This 13-year-old Oregon boy told a judge how happy he was to get adopted, and it brought his mom to tears. His sweet words about his family will melt your heart.
Source: Thankful teenage boy gives sweet speech during adoption

34
Is Mark Wahlberg's workout a good idea?

The actor follows a super-intense workout routine to stay in shape for his roles. Dr. Janette Nesheiwat joins CBSN to discuss whether more average gym-goers would benefit from his approach.
Source: Is Mark Wahlberg's workout a good idea?

35
How Puerto Rico's tax code benefits the wealthy

Puerto Rico's economy has been declining for decades, but Hurricane Maria has made the situation dire. Now, some fear that wealthy mainland citizens will take advantage of a generous tax exemption. GQ contributor Jesse Barron went to the island to talk some investors who are moving to the island.
Source: How Puerto Rico's tax code benefits the wealthy

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